2019 FINA World Championships Predictions: Mixed 4×100 Free Relay Features Numerous Scenarios

nathan-adrian-mallory-comerford-caeleb-remel-dressel-usa-relay-mixed-4x100-2017-world-champs
The United States is looking to repeat in the mixed 4x100 free relay. Photo Courtesy: SIPA USA

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The mixed 4×100 free relay is a relatively new addition to the World Championships lineup as it was added in 2015. The United States, Netherlands and Canada have won the gold, silver and bronze at the last two World Championships. Will that trend continue in 2019? The Australians are probably the most stacked team in the 100 free, but have not put their best team out behind the blocks. They did not even swim in 2015 and swam a B team in 2017. If they put their best swimmers on the relay (Cate Campbell, Emma McKeonKyle ChalmersClyde Lewis) then they are strong contenders to win the gold medal.

The mixed 4×100 free relay is not an Olympic event unlike the mixed medley relay, which was added to next year’s Olympic schedule. With the event not on the Olympic program, Australia hasn’t treated this event with any emphasis, thus leaving their best swimmers to rest for the medley relays on the last day. The mixed 4×100 free relay is not as unpredictable as the mixed medley. Most countries start with two men and end with two women. There isn’t as much drama as in the medley where countries can swim in any order that best fits their stroke specialists.

The Americans have won the last two world titles in this relay as they have the likes of Caeleb Dressel and Simone Manuel, two gold medal favorites in the 100 free. The second spots are a bit wide open on each side with the likes of Blake PieroniZach AppleNathan Adrian, etc. competing for that second spot. Behind Manuel, Mallory ComerfordAbbey Weitzeil and Margo Geer all have chances to get on the relay. Whoever the United States decides to put on the relay will give them a chance to win the gold medal. In 2017, they went with Dressel, Adrian, Comerford and Manuel and broke the world record at 3:19.60. A world record might be a bit of a reach here but it isn’t impossible.

If Dressel swims this event, it will be the third swim on day seven for him as he will (most likely) have the 50 free and 100 fly finals earlier in the session.

France had the fastest time in the world in 2018 but only because the European Championships were the only major international meet to feature this non-Olympic event last summer. The French have a strong team on paper with Mehdy MetellaClement MignonCharlotte Bonnet and Beryl Gastaldello. The race really depends on which coaching staffs put their best four swimmers out there and who takes this event seriously.

Based on 2019 times, the top eight looks as follows:

  1. 3:20.34, Australia
  2. 3:23.18, United States
  3. 3:23.89, France
  4. 3:24.16, Russia
  5. 3:24.54, Netherlands
  6. 3:24.57, Canada
  7. 3:24.86, Brazil
  8. 3:25.25, Japan

The Netherlands and Canada each have two strong women on the end with Ranomi Kromowidjojo and Femke Heemskerk for the Dutch and Taylor Ruck and Penny Oleksiak for the Canadians. The problem is those countries don’t have the two men to compete with the likes of Russia and France. Russia has the second fastest man in the world right now in Vladislav Grinev and veteran Vladimir Morozov. But the Russians don’t have the women to compete with the Netherlands and Canada.

Current Records:

World Record: 3:19.60, United States, 2017 – Caeleb Dressel, Nathan Adrian, Mallory Comerford, Simone Manuel
Championships Record: 3:19.60, United States, 2017 – Caeleb Dressel, Nathan Adrian, Mallory Comerford, Simone Manuel
American Record: 3:19.60, 2017 – Caeleb Dressel, Nathan Adrian, Mallory Comerford, Simone Manuel

2017 World Champion: United States, 3:19.60, 2017 – Caeleb Dressel, Nathan Adrian, Mallory Comerford, Simone Manuel
2018 Fastest Times:

  1. 3:22.07, France
  2. 3:23.97, Netherlands
  3. 3:24.50, Russia
  4. 3:24.94, Italy
  5. 3:26.59, Germany
  6. 3:29.30, Hungary
  7. 3:29.62, Poland
  8. 3:29.73, Israel

Swimming World’s team of Andy RossDan D’AddonaDavid RiederDiana Pimer and Taylor Covington will be selecting their choices for the medals at World Championships in each event. Read below who everybody picked.

Andy’s Picks:

  1. Australia
  2. United States
  3. France

Dan’s Picks:

  1. Australia
  2. United States
  3. Netherlands

David’s Picks:

  1. United States
  2. Australia
  3. Netherlands

Diana’s Picks:

  1. Australia
  2. United States
  3. Netherlands

Taylor’s Picks:

  1. United States
  2. Australia
  3. Netherlands

2019 FINA World Championships Predictions:

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