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NCAA Division I Men's Championships: Texas Counters California With 800 Free Relay -- March 27, 2010

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COLUMBUS, Ohio, March 27. IN what turned out to be a back-and-forth affair during the second day of the NCAA Division I Men's Championships, Texas scored the final blow of the night with a splendid effort in the men's 800 free relay.

Texas' Scott Jostes (1:33.25), Dave Walters (1:32.76), Neil Caskey (1:33.86) and Ricky Berens (1:32.90) won the race in 6:12.77. The triumph gave Texas its 11th in the event's history. Previously, the Longhorns won the title in 1988-91, 1998-2001, 2003 and 2009. The time crushed the previous pool record of 6:15.80 set by Michigan at Big Tens last month.


Florida's Shaune Fraser, Brett Fraser, Jeffrey Raymond and Conor Dwyer finished a distant second in 6:14.72, while Arizona's Jean Basson, Nimrod Shapira Bar-Or, Jack Brown and Joel Greenshields placed third in 6:18.33.

California lost the chance to put a dagger in Texas' title hopes when it fell back to 10th in the race with a 6:23.89 from Nathan Adrian, Graeme Moore, Ben Hinshaw and Tom Shields. That effort left the door open for Texas in what should be an illuminating final day of prelims.

Cal finished a grueling second day of battle in the pool with the leading tally of 348.5 points. Texas remained in second with 330 points, while Arizona stood third with 269 points. Florida (264) and Stanford (221) completed the top five, while Auburn (215.5) was in striking distance of the top five.

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Results: NCAA Division I Men's Championships

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March 27, 2010 Come on TEXAS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Submitted by: swimfan3
March 28, 2010 Cole Cragin's 46.11 100 back is a 17-18 NAG record.

He was born 04/07/91.

Shields' 100 fly time would be a 167-18 NAG record too but he was faster last month @ Pac-10 -- 45.75.

He's now fourth freshman, joining Mark Spitz, Pablo Morales and Ian Crocker, to win 100 fly his rookie year.

Yet hee has a good ways to go to rank No. 1 natinally this year.

That honor goes to former Stnford Cardinal Ausin Staab, who swam a sizzling 44.72 earlier this month in Buffalo at the Speedo Sectionals meet --tied w/Crocker for seventh-fastest performance all-time.

He (Staab) holds American/NCAA record with his 44.18 from last year's NCAAs.

Crocker's 44.72, set whule winning his fourth-straight Big 12 title six years ago, is hs pr.

Hopefully he and Mr. Hansen will in the not too distant future decide there's still some life left in them there legs/arms and give it one final shot before London.

But I WON'T hoild my breath.
Submitted by: slickwillie32
March 28, 2010 How is 44.91 slower than 45.75??
Submitted by: JakedBadForYou
March 28, 2010 When yug become confused in what time you are dealing with and apparently write 443.91" ratherr than the correct "45.96" which is in fact old NAG record Crocker swam as a freshman @ 2001 NCAAs.

Thx for noting the discrepancy.

Now I think you will find Shields' 45.75 from Pac-10s makes mas sense.
Submitted by: slickwillie32
March 28, 2010 No, actually it still doesn't make "mas" sense...

When you become confused in what time you are dealing with and apparently write 45.96" rather than the correct "44.91" which is in fact the new NAG record Shields swam as a freshman @ 2010 NCAAs.

So what you meant to write was:

Shields' 100 fly time (44.91) would be a 17-18 NAG record too but he was slower last month @ Pac-10 -- 45.75, so it actually is!

Now I think you will find Shields' 44.91 from NCAA's makes more sense.

Hopefully Staab will in the not too distant future decide there's still some life left in them there collegiate legs/arms and give it one final shot before his eligibility runs out.

And you can bet Stanford will hold their collective breath!
Submitted by: JakedBadForYou
March 28, 2010 If I had a brain I'd b e a menace.

Let's tryo ne last time.

Yes, Shields' 44.91 from lastnite in1 100 fly is NAG record.

His OLD NAG record is/was 45.75 from Pacc-10s a month earlier.

Prior to that time the record was 45.96 by Crocker from '01 NCAAs.

Shields moves into fifth all-time(performers) and 11th (performances).

He scored in the consols of the 200 free too but that was just to try and score as many points as he could so Cal could continueto to stay within striking distance of Terxas in team race.

Give him a meet of conseqence like NCAAs where he doesn't have to swiim 200 free-100 fly double back-to-back and he could do some real damage in former.

And if he only had to worry aboutswimming 100 fly on a given day...would you believe 40flat?

Well maybe not quite that fast but...

Wonder what the world record-holder/double-defending Olympic champ in the 100 m fly could swim scy were he to set his mind to it and the meet/conditions were right?

He's never held the American 100 yard fly record.

The U.S. Nationals (scy) are the first weekend of December @ Ohio State.

The World sc Championshps begin exactly two weeks layer in Dubai.

One would presume the U.S. team would be @ its overseas base during nationals preparing for The Big Dance.

Maybe King Mark and his staff might think it'd be a good idea to get a final tune-up meet under the team's belt before heading out to battle the world so...how 'bout Columbus?

However, even were the U.S. yeam to compete they'd be likely to just "swim through" the competition.

Phelps, however, isn't like that. He doesn't "dog it" at meets.
Submitted by: slickwillie32
March 28, 2010 "Give him a meet of conseqence like NCAAs where he doesn't have to swiim 200 free-100 fly double back-to-back and he could do some real damage in former.

And if he only had to worry aboutswimming 100 fly on a given day...would you believe 40flat?"

No... not in the 100 fly, 100 free or anything else. Tom - like all other true competitors - do not worry about a race coming up when they have a chance to win and put 20 points on the board for their team. So he wasn't thinking a rat's ass about the 200 free until after the 100 fly final. I'd say we saw his best in 100 fly this weekend, and maybe he has a 1.33 in him under ideal conditions (evening swim), considering his 1.34 this morning.

Phelps, not sure he has the explosive power to truly dominate a 100y fly. Crocker at his peak (wasn't rested for PAC-10's 2004, NC's were SCM that year) and Cavic are the ones I see as capable of going 43 in that event
Submitted by: JakedBadForYou
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2010MNCAADI  Texas wins the 800 freestyle relay at the 2010 Men's NCAA Swimming & Diving Championships.
Photo By: Peter H. Bick

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