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FINA World Championships, Swimming: China Leads Women's 400 Medley Relay Qualifying, United States Misses Finals -- August 1, 2009

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ROME, Italy, August 1. CHINA continues to make its mark in the women's relays as the nation scored the top seed heading into the women's 400 medley relay finale at the FINA World Championships.


China's foursome of Zhao Jing (1:00.24), Chen Huijia (1:05.04), Jiao Liuyang (56.92) and Li Zhesi (53.94) topped qualifying in 3:56.14.

Japan's Shiho Sakai (59.47), Nanaka Tamura (1:06.55), Yuka Kato (57.45) and Haruka Ueda (53.97) qualified second in 3:57.44.

Germany's Daniela Samulski (1:00.16), Sarah Poewe (1:06.74), Annika Mehlhorn (57.36) and Daniela Schreiber (53.49) completed the top three in 3:57.75.

The Netherlands (3:58.05), Great Britain (3:58.18), Canada (3:58.23), Australia (3:58.36) and Brazil (3:58.49) also made the finale.

In a stunning turn of events, medal favorite United States could not make it out of prelims with a 10th-place 3:59.01 produced by Elizabeth Pelton (1:00.78), Kasey Carlson (1:06.79), Christine Magnuson (57.29) and Julia Smit (54.15).



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August 1, 2009 It doesn't surprise me the US missing the final, US coaches still underestimate the rest of the world. Besides, US female swimmers have not been in the top for the last 10 years, with a few exceptions (Coughlin, Hoff for a while). Even Torres, she has never won an individual world or olympic title... time to be more humble, Australia is the example to folow. Even so, the US should have been top 3 if the best swimmers had raced (Mc Gregory, Soni, Vollmer and Weir)
Submitted by: Max Argie
August 1, 2009 Those are all very mediocre relay times for the Americans. The B-team won't cut it at this level any more.
Submitted by: fluidg
August 1, 2009 Kasey Carlson's split is particularly slow. If she had swum a 1:05 (as she did in the individual race), the US would hv qualified for the final comfortably.
Submitted by: chris
August 1, 2009
Why in the world was Smit swimming free? Why not Torres or Weir? That's just bad coaching. Who made that call? Schuberrt? Hutchison? Bowman?
Submitted by: jeffyfit
August 1, 2009 I agree, seeing Smit on the end of that relay was a shocker. I thought they would have used maybe Vollmer. I can see why they might not have used Weir or Torres because they both swam the 50 prelims.
Submitted by: squiggles255
August 1, 2009 I actually expected them to use Smit, to rest Vollmer for fly in finals. Obviously, it didn't work too well. Actually, all except Pelton should have been at least a half second faster. (Pelton was fine, considering she has the 200 back final later.)
Submitted by: SwimDER94
August 1, 2009 I have to agree with Max; the U.S. coaches underestimated the field. Interestingly, some of the teams with less depth than the U.S. had no choice but to swim their A team in the prelims, which ended up helping them make finals. Others used a judicious mix of A and B swimmers. In the past the U.S. B team could beat alot of the other A teams, but those days are over.

But I would disagree slightly about Australia being the model, though. They barely squeaked in themselves, swimming 3 "B" swimmers and still almost missing out; they were at least smart enough to have Seebohm lead off .

Not sure what was up with Magnuson this meet; she's been off all week and was a full second off of her split from Beijing, despite having a good Trials this year. Using their times from this meet, most likely the U.S. would have gotten the bronze had they made the final.
Submitted by: liquidassets
August 2, 2009 I hope Swimming World is digging into this story which has robbed the country of an opportunity to be represented in the race and denied some excellent US swimmers the opportunity to race. How was this decision made? What were the arguments put forward by each of the US coaches? Who takes responsibility for this decision?
One can understand an individual like Piersol making a misjudgment about how fast to go to qualify but one has to question an entire team of professional coaches making the same mistake.
Submitted by: dabineri
August 2, 2009 I hope Swimming World is digging into this story which has robbed the country of an opportunity to be represented in the race and denied some excellent US swimmers the opportunity to race. How was this decision made? What were the arguments put forward by each of the US coaches? Who takes responsibility for this decision?
One can understand an individual like Piersol making a misjudgment about how fast to go to qualify but one has to question an entire team of professional coaches making the same mistake.
Submitted by: dabineri
August 2, 2009 I hope Swimming World is digging into this story which has robbed the country of an opportunity to be represented in the race and denied some excellent US swimmers the opportunity to race and possibly earn a medal. How was this decision made? What were the arguments put forward by each of the US coaches? Who takes responsibility for this decision?
One can understand an individual like Piersol making a misjudgment about how fast to go to qualify but one has to question an entire team of professional coaches making the same mistake.
Submitted by: dabineri
Reaction Time responses do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions
of Swimming World Magazine or SwimmingWorldMagazine.com.

Reaction Time is provided as a service to our readers.




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