Swimming World Presents “Swimming Technique Concepts: Development of an Optimal Model For Technique – Part 6”

swimming technique concept part 6

Swimming Technique Concepts: Development of an Optimal Model For Technique – Part 6
Environmental Base of Support for Butterfly

By Rod Havriluk

The first three articles of this series (Swimming World July, August and September) addressed concepts related to a body’s position in water that minimizes swimming resistance. Specifically, body size and shape (Part I), body rotation (Part II) and head position and motion (Part III) were each presented as essential elements to control for optimizing swimming technique. All of these factors help to minimize resistance, but also help to make a stable “base of support” to maximize propulsion.

SW December introduced a new approach to using a well-established concept for land-based activities: the “base of support” (BOS). The BOS is fundamental for addressing body stability. In a terrestrial activity like running, the BOS refers to the contact of a limb extremity (such as the foot) with the ground (the environment). Last month’s article (SW January) explained the shoulder position required to create a stable body BOS. This article explains the arm motion to stabilize the hand in the environmental BOS.

To swim butterfly as fast as possible, a swimmer must first optimize the body base of support (by minimizing vertical movement of the shoulder) and then position the hand to gain the most stability from a relatively unstable environmental BOS. With a stable body BOS, a swimmer can more precisely control the hand pitch and hand path to achieve a more effective hand position in the environmental BOS, maximum propulsion and the fastest swimming velocity.

 

To learn more about developing a base of support for butterfly, check out the February 2019 issue of Swimming World, available now. Swimming World subscribers can download this issue in the Swimming World Vault!

SW February 2019 Cover

[PHOTO CREDIT: PETER H. BICK]

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FEATURES

018 MENTAL PREP: BEFORE THE BEEP WITH JOSH PRENOT
by Annie Grevers

023 HISTORIC SWIMMING FIRSTS IN BLACK HISTORY
by Bruce Wigo
In recognition of Black History Month, which is celebrated in the United States in February, Swimming World takes a look at some historic accomplishments in swimming turned in by athletes of African descent.

025 WILD AND CRAZY
by David Rieder
History has proven that the women’s 100 yard backstroke is an event where wacky, unexpected results are the norm, whether because of the typical depth of field, the format of the meet, the factors of the race or some other reason entirely.

026 BACK ON TOP
by David Rieder
Beata Nelson, a high school record holder in the 100 yard fly and Swimming World’s 2016 Female High School Swimmer of the Year, once considered backstroke her secondary stroke. But after clocking a 49.67 last November, the University of Wisconsin junior is now the American record holder in the 100 yard backstroke.

028 ALL IN THE FAMILY
by Dan D’Addona
It was a moment that didn’t become real until they embraced. Arkansas freshman diver Brooke Schultz had just won the NCAA championship in 3-meter diving and stood, half in shock, on the podium, and accepted the championship trophy from her coach. But it wasn’t just her coach—it was her father, Dale Schultz.

030 NUTRITION: AROUND THE TABLE WITH JUSTIN WRIGHT
by Annie Grevers and Dawn Weatherwax

COACHING

010 LESSONS WITH THE LEGENDS: DON LAMONT
by Michael J. Stott

014 SWIMMING TECHNIQUE CONCEPTS: DEVELOPMENT OF AN OPTIMAL MODEL FOR TECHNIQUE: PART 6—ENVIRONMENTAL BASE OF SUPPORT FOR BUTTERFLY
by Rod Havriluk
To swim butterfly as fast as possible, a swimmer must first optimize the body base of support (by minimizing vertical movement of the shoulder) and then position the hand to gain the most stability from a relatively unstable environmental BOS. With a stable body BOS, a swimmer can more precisely control the hand pitch and hand path to achieve a more effective hand position in the environmental BOS, maximum propulsion and the fastest swimming velocity.

016 INSPIRING SWIMMERS…AND TESTING LIMITS (Part 2)
by Michael J. Stott
Once swimmers are inspired to complete a difficult task, the resulting action often involves a test of
one’s limits. In this two-part series, four veteran coaches share insights on how they motivate the athletes entrusted to their care. Swimming World’s January issue featured Gregg Troy and Jessica O’Donnell, while Catherine Vogt and Richard Hunter continue the discussion in February.

040 SPECIAL SETS: GETTING IT ON—A RECIPE FOR POWER AND PRECISION
by Michael J. Stott
Megan Oesting, owner and head coach of the Eastern Iowa Swim Federation, provides two sample sets that her Eastern Iowa Swim Federation age groupers do to help prepare them for competition.

042 Q&A WITH COACH JOSH CHRISTENSEN
by Michael J. Stott

043 HOW THEY TRAIN: LAURA FORNSHELL
by Michael J. Stott

TRAINING

013 DRYSIDE TRAINING: EXERCISE EQUIPMENT SERIES—STRETCH CORDS
by J.R. Rosania

JUNIOR SWIMMER

020 GOLDMINDS: POSITIVE PARENT POINTERS (Part 2)
by Wayne Goldsmith
The January issue of Swimming World featured #s 1-15 of 30 things that swimming parents can do to help their child realize his or her potential—as swimmers…and as human beings. This month’s magazine gives you the rest of the list: #s 16-30.

046 UP & COMERS: JUSTINA KOZAN
by Taylor Brien

COLUMNS & SPECIAL SECTIONS

008 A VOICE FOR THE SPORT
009 BEYOND THE YARDS
022 DID YOU KNOW? MARJORIE GESTRING
033 2019 SWIM CAMP DIRECTORY
047 GUTTER TALK
048 PARTING SHOT

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