Swimming World Presents – NJCAA Championships – Quality & Quantity: Indian River’s Winning Formula

Swimming World June 2021 - NJCAA Championships - Quality & Quantity - Indian River's Winning Formula
Indian River’s Taryn Dailey (first) celebrates with teammate Isabela Cabrera Duarte (third) after IRSC captured the top four places in the women’s 200 fly at NJCAAs.

The latest issue of Swimming World Magazine
is now available for download in the Swimming World Vault!

Non-Subscribers Can Download This Issue Here

NJCAA Championships

Quality & Quantity: Indian River’s Winning Formula

By Andy Ross


That’s the same winning formula that Indian River’s men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams have been using for nearly a half-century at the NJCAA Championships. The Pioneer men now have won 47 straight team titles; the women, 39—and 43 of the past 47.


MEN’S RACE: INDIAN RIVER 1,340, IOWA CENTRAL 690.5, SOUTHWESTERN OREGON 598

Indian River State College’s men continue to have the longest unbroken U.S. championship winning streak in any sport at the collegiate level. They did it by winning 20 of the 25 NJCAA Championship events at their home pool in Fort Pierce, Fla., April 28-May 1. They also qualified 46.67% of all of the swimmers who competed in the A-finals.

Coach Sion Brinn’s men snatched the top four places in two races, top three in five, and top two in 11 (including both diving events). And they swept all five relays.

Michael Deans (breast), Brennan Hammond (fly) and Dean Walker (free) swam with backstrokers Nicholas Fauteux (200) and Jhon Moncada (400) to win both medleys (1:30.67, 3:17.59). IRSC dominated the freestyle relays, winning the 200 by 4+ seconds (1:21.57—Fauteux, Walker, Luke Altmann, John Zeiger), 400 by 6+ seconds (3:00.61—Altmann, Caleb Brandon, Walker, Zeiger) and 800 by 11+ seconds (6:41.70—Brandon, Chance Conde, Hammond, Zeiger).

IRSC’s Aramis Rivera was named Male Swimmer of the Meet, sweeping the 100-200-400 yard IMs (50.21, 1:48.63, 3:54.56) and finishing second in the 200 breast to teammate Michael Deans (1:56.82). Taking top honors in diving was TJ Ray, who swept the 1- and 3-meter boards (402.35, 426.80).

 

WOMEN’S RACE: INDIAN RIVER 1,374, SOUTHWESTERN OREGON 674, IOWA CENTRAL 562
Indian River’s women were just as impressive as the men. They won 19 of 25 events and qualified 48% of all of the swimmers who competed in A-finals. They took the top four places in seven events, top three in nine, top two in 13 (including the two diving events)… PLUS the top six swimmers in the women’s 500 yard free! And IRSC swept the relays.

Catherine Royden-Turner (back), Rylee Woelk (breast), Taryn Dailey (fly) and Sydney Weatherspoon (free) joined forces to sweep the medley relays (200 1:45.50, 400 3:53.53), with Royden-Turner, Dailey and Weatherspoon combining with Kailea Green to win the 200 freestyle relay (1:37.15) by nearly four seconds.

Dailey and Green also swam on the winning 400 free relay (3:32.36) with Victoria Ortiz and Lillian Lewis, while Ortiz, Green and Lewis followed leadoff swimmer Esther Rydbeck to win the 800 free relay (7:41.21).

Dailey and Ortiz also won four individual events apiece and shared honors for Female Co-Swimmers of the Meet.

 

To read more about Indian River’s men’s and women’s NJCAA successes,
Click here to download the full June 2021 Issue of Swimming World, available now!

Swimming World June 2021 - Nathan Adrian - A Natural Leader - COVER
[PHOTO CREDIT: TAYLOR BRIEN]


Get Swimming World Magazine and Swimming World Biweekly FREE When You

Become A Member of the International Swimming Hall of Fame

New! 30 Day Membership to ISHOF AND Digital Swimming World Subscription for just $10 a month!

Want more? Get a 1 Year ISHOF Family Membership With Swimming World Print AND Digital Subscription Order Now!

Non-Subscribers can click here to download this issue for only $5.94

Swimming World June 2021 Issue

FEATURES

12  |  U.S. OLYMPIC TRIALS PREVIEW
by David Rieder
The fastest swimmers in the United States will be putting their hopes and dreams on the line at the U.S. Olympic Team Trials-Swimming, June 13-20, in Omaha, Neb. If realized, they’ll have the opportunity to perform next month on the world’s grandest stage: the Olympic Games in Tokyo.

22  |  A NATURAL LEADER
by John Lohn
Still producing elite-level performances, Nathan Adrian, now 32 and pursuing his fourth Olympic Games, has the opportunity to further his already lofty reputation. And whenever his days in the sport come to an end, Adrian will be viewed for his excellence in the sport as an athlete, teammate and ambassador.

25  |  NJCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS: QUALITY & QUANTITY
by Andy Ross
That’s the same winning formula that Indian River’s men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams have been using for nearly a half-century at the NJCAA Championships. The Pioneer men now have won 47 straight team titles; the women, 39—and 43 of the past 47.

26  |  TAKEOFF TO TOKYO: A FORGOTTEN STAR
by John Lohn
By all measures, Don Schollander is a legend in the sport, a Hall of Fame talent who was unrivaled in his heyday. Yet, his impact has been lost to a combination of unfortunate timing and modern-day fascination.

29  |  DOMINANCE AND PARITY ON DISPLAY IN TOKYO
by Dan D’Addona
While the U.S. women have dominated international water polo since 2015—winning their second straight Olympics in 2016 plus three World Championships in 2015-17-19—a different men’s champion has emerged at each of the last three major international competitions—Serbia (2016 Olympics), Croatia (2017 Worlds) and Italy (2019 Worlds).

30  |  ISHOF: REMEMBERING THE KALILI BROTHERS—90 YEARS AGO
by Bruce Wigo
As kids who preferred to dive for coins rather than race in a swimming pool, brothers Maiola and Manuella Kalili from Hawaii would eventually become national champions and Olympic silver medalists in 1932.

33  |  NUTRITION: HOW MANY CALORIES SHOULD I EAT?
by Dawn Weatherwax
As long course, Olympics and endurance events get underway, a common question is: “How much do I need to eat?” This is a loaded question—one in which the author will try to simplify.

35  |  MENTAL PREP: BEFORE THE BEEP WITH AMY BILQUIST
by Shoshanna Rutemiller

COACHING

38  |  SWIMMING TECHNIQUE CONCEPTS: MAXIMIZING SWIMMING VELOCITY (Part 2)—STROKE CYCLE PHASES
by Rod Havriluk
Swimmers typically decrease non-propulsive time to decrease stroke time, increase stroke rate and swim faster. Research shows that a further decrease in the non-propulsive time is possible and should produce further performance improvement.

40  |  A COACHES’ GUIDE TO  ENERGY SYSTEMS
by Michael J. Stott
In the first of two parts, Swimming World explores the concept of energy systems and how coaches can use them to maximize athlete development and performance.

42  |  SPECIAL SETS: KATIE LEDECKY—RUN-UP TO RIO 2016
by Michael J. Stott
With this month’s Olympic Swimming Trials now upon us, Swimming World takes a back-to-the-future approach to revisit some training done by superstar Katie Ledecky prior to the 2016 U.S. team qualifying meet.

44  |  Q&A WITH COACH  CATHERINE KASE
by Michael J. Stott

45  |  HOW THEY TRAIN  HALEY ANDERSON
by Michael J. Stott

TRAINING

037  |  DRYSIDE TRAINING:  TRAINING AMY BILQUIST
by J.R. Rosania

JUNIOR SWIMMER

47  |  UP & COMERS:  KEELAN COTTER
by Shoshanna Rutemiller

COLUMNS

08  |  A VOICE FOR THE SPORT

11  |   DID YOU KNOW:  ABOUT BUSTER CRABBE?

48  |  GUTTERTALK

49  |  PARTING SHOT

 

Swimming World is now partnered with the International Swimming Hall of Fame. To find out more, visit us at ishof.org