Swimming World Presents “Did You Know? Fun Facts About ISHOF+Masters Hall of Famers”

Sandy Nielson Did You Know

Did You Know?

Fun Facts About ISHOF/Masters Hall of Famers

 

There are four honorees of the International Swimming Hall of Fame who also have been inducted into the International Masters Swimming Hall of Fame later in their careers.

SANDY NEILSON-BELL
USA
(1986/2005)
Sandy Neilson won three gold medals at the 1972 Olympics in Munich when she was just 16. After swimming in college at UCSB, she retired from the sport. But she returned nine years later as a Masters swimmer after taking a job coaching the Industry Hills (Calif.) Masters and seeing how much fun her swimmers were having.

Neilson-Bell was the first female Masters swimmer to compete in the U.S. Olympic Trials at ages 32 (1988) and 36 (1992). Her fifth-place time in the 50 free in 1988 would have finaled at the Seoul Olympics. When she was 40, she missed qualifying for the 1996 Trials by 9-hundredths of a second.

MARIA LENK
BRAZIL, USA (1988/2008)
In 1932 at the age of 17, Maria Lenk became the first South American woman to participate in the Summer Olympics. She again represented Brazil in 1936, where she also was a pioneer in the evolution of the butterfly stroke. In 1939, she became the first Brazilian to set a world record in swimming (200 meter breast, 2:56.9).

As a Masters swimmer for both Brazil and the USA, she set 37 Masters world records in all strokes and the individual medley—17 LC/20 SC.

She also ranked in the Top 10 for 20 years until she died at the age of 92 in 2007, a year before she was inducted posthumously into the Masters Swimming Hall of Fame.

To learn more fun facts about our Hall of Famers Sandy, Maria, Jeff Farrell, and Yoshi Oyakawa,
check out the April 2019 issue of Swimming World Magazine, available now!

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FEATURES

016 2018 TOP 12 WORLD MASTERS SWIMMERS OF THE YEAR
by Dan D’Addona, David Rieder and Taylor Brien

022 A CUT ABOVE THE REST
by Michael Randazzo
Despite Jovan Vavic’s stunning eviction from Troy, USC and Stanford remain the teams to beat at this year’s NCAA Women’s Water Polo Championships in May. The Trojans beat the Cardinal 5-4 last year at their home pool, but Stanford will play host to the NCAA’s top teams in 2019. In the past nine years, Stanford has captured five national titles, with USC winning four—including two of the last three.

026 OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS
by Michael Randazzo
Paola Dominguez-Castro, a high school junior living in Hialeah, Fla.—and considered one of the most impressive young water polo talents in the country—has the opportunity to break free of the environment that has both sustained and developed that talent, and become an example for others who might aspire to greater success.

030 THE GREATEST SWIM IN HISTORY
by Bruce Wigo
At the 1965 AAU Short Course Nationals, a capacity crowd of 3,000 thought they had just seen “the greatest swim in history.” They cheered wildly for FIVE MINUTES after Steve Clark had broken the 46-second barrier in the 100 yard freestyle with a 45.6. After watching Caeleb Dressel’s three barrier-breaking swims at last year’s NCAAs—and believing that Dressel can swim even faster—Clark, now 75, believes “the greatest swim in history has yet to happen.”

034 NUTRITION: AROUND THE TABLE WITH MICHIGAN LAKESHORE AQUATICS
by Dan D’Addona and Dawn Weatherwax

COACHING

010 LESSONS WITH THE LEGENDS: TAMAS SZECHY
by Michael J. Stott

014 SWIMMING TECHNIQUE CONCEPTS: CONDITIONING TO OPTIMIZE TECHNIQUE (Part 1)
by Rod Havriluk

038 WHAT COACHES CAN LEARN FROM SWIMMERS (Part 2)
by Michael J. Stott
This is the second of a two-part series in which Swimming World shares epiphanies from coaches whose athletes fundamentally altered their coaching philosophy. Last month’s article dealt with the individuality of swimmers. This month, coaches discuss the importance of feedback.

040 SPECIAL SETS: IM TRANSITION SETS
by Michael J. Stott
Ken Heis, head coach of the Mason (Ohio) Manta Rays, has a studied approach to IM training, honed by experimentation and experience. Here the four-time Ohio Swimming Coach of the Year shares some sample IM transition sets.

043 Q&A WITH COACH ADAM EPSTEIN
by Michael J. Stott

044 HOW THEY TRAIN :LUKAS MACEK
by Michael J. Stott

TRAINING

013 DRYSIDE TRAINING: EXERCISE EQUIPMENT SERIES—TRX SUSPENSION STRAPS
by J.R. Rosania

JUNIOR SWIMMER

036 GOLDMINDS: LESSONS ABOUT LOSING
by Wayne Goldsmith

046 UP & COMERS: NATALIE MANNION
by Taylor Brien

COLUMNS

008 A VOICE FOR THE SPORT

009 BEYOND THE YARDS

025 MOMS AT MEETS

029 DID YOU KNOW? ISHOF/MASTERS HALL OF FAMERS

047 GUTTER TALK

048 PARTING SHOT