Three-Time Olympian Glenn Snyders Announces Retirement

Photo Courtesy: Ian MacNicol

One of New Zealand’s most gifted and decorated swimmers, Glenn Snyders, has officially retired from the sport.

The 29-year-old from the North Shore club is one of only four New Zealand swimmers to compete in three Olympic Games.

Snyders is based in Los Angeles where he was recently married to Jenna Snyders (nee Petrie) in September, having moved there to train with renowned U.S. coach Dave Salo following his London Olympic Games campaign in 2012.

Snyders currently holds the national records in all men’s breaststroke events, both short course and long course. He is the only Kiwi swimmer to go under the one minute mark in the 100m breaststroke, clocking 59.94s at the World Championships in 2011, lowering this to 59.78s at the London Olympics.

He was born in South Africa, after his family moved there from England for 10 years, before they moved to New Zealand when he was 12. Snyders linked up with the North Shore Swimming Club and was coached by Jan Cameron, Thomas Ansorg and Mark Regan at North Shore and the Swimming New Zealand High Performance Centre before his move to California.

He is a Commonwealth Games silver medallist and won the bronze medal in the 100m breaststroke at the Pan Pacific Championship in 2014.

Snyders is also known for some outstanding performances in relays, highlighted by a stunning 59.46s split to help New Zealand to fifth place in the final of the 4x100m medley relay at the Beijing Olympics.

Swimming New Zealand has praised Snyders for his contribution to the sport.

“Glenn has clearly been an outstanding, world-class swimmer for more than a decade. During that time he has not only acted in a thoroughly professional and dedicated manner in the pool, but he has been a leader out of the pool,” said Swimming New Zealand Chairman Bruce Cotterill.

“After London he could have left the sport but instead re-dedicated himself, made the bold step to move to the USA to receive expert coaching in breaststroke, and ultimately return for a third straight Olympics.

“We wish him well in his retirement and his new life with Jenna and we hope he continues to have a role in our sport.”

He joins Dean Kent, Helen Norfolk and Lauren Boyle as the only New Zealand swimmers to contest three Olympics.

“Representing New Zealand in swimming has been an honour and a privilege. To have been able to compete at the highest level in my sport for 12 consecutive years has been nothing but an adventure and life-learning experience, one that I will take with me on my new journey leading forward,” Snyders said.

“Retiring from swimming is just a step forward in my life. It wasn’t the easiest of decisions to walk away from the sport I love but I knew it is the right time and decision, one that I am content with. I look forward to the next chapter in my life, which has already begun by getting married and settling down in Los Angeles with my wife Jenna.

“Thanks go to Swimming New Zealand and High Performance Sport NZ for their support during my career. Without them I would not have been able to compete at three Olympic Games and do what I love. “

Snyders also thanked his long-time sponsors Speedo for their support for more than a decade, allowing him access to the best equipment to perform at his best.

He also thanked friends and family for their “unconditional support” over the years in both the highs and lows of his career.

Snyders said he is yet to firm-up on a career path after swimming, but would like to have an association with the sport in the future.

Press release courtesy of Swimming New Zealand.

Comments Off on Three-Time Olympian Glenn Snyders Announces Retirement

Author: David Rieder

avatar
David Rieder is a staff writer for Swimming World. He has contributed to the magazine and website since 2009, and he has covered the NCAA Championships, U.S. Nationals, Olympic Trials as well as the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio and the 2017 World Championships in Budapest. He is a native of Charleston, S.C., and a 2016 graduate of Duke University.

Current Swimming World Issue


Trouble Viewing on Smart Phones, Tablets or iPads? Click Here