The Complete Guide to Prom: Swimmer Edition

swimmer-promposal
Photo Courtesy: Instagram, @chemical.chlorine

By Kate Walter, Swimming World Intern.

When the months of April and May roll around and spring championship meet season finally ends, high school swimmers trade in their knee skins and sweatpants for tuxedos and dresses. The season of prom is unlike any other, especially within the swimming community. From the overtop “promposals” at meets to posting “swimmer strength” pictures on Instagram, here is the complete guide to prom, swimmer edition.

Step One: “Promposals” the Swim Way 

“Promposals” – elaborate ways of asking people to prom or other dances – have become very popular in recent years. Not surprisingly, swimmers who tend to give 100 percent with everything they do have eagerly taken to this trend, posting pictures and videos on social media with the hashtag #swomdates (slang for “swimmer prom dates”) in a race for creativity. Here are some examples of ways swimmers have asked other swimmers to prom, from making catchy posters to mid-race surprises! 

Olympian Missy Franklin even got in on the action, sharing her “promposal” experience during her senior year of high school in 2013.

Step Two: Inspiration from Olympians

It’s important to remember that Olympic gold medalists and world record holders were once just high schoolers, rushing to get to class before the bell rang, laughing with their friends during lunch time and eagerly partaking in all of the quintessential high school experiences. Back in their teenage years, swimmers such as Missy Franklin, Lilly King, Kathleen Baker, and Caleb Dressesl shared photos from their high school dances. They reminded us all that while when they were smashing world records and traveling internationally for meets, they were also living the lives of normal teenagers, making the best of memories at school dances.

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#prom #nonecooler

A post shared by Caeleb Dressel (@caelebdressel) on

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Ready for Prom with my favorite Smurfs💃💙

A post shared by Lilly King (@_king_lil) on

Step Three: Hair and Skin Care

Leading up to the day, it is important for swimmers to take care of their hair to make sure it looks healthy, fresh and easily stylable for the big dance. While it is important that swimmers and all other aquatic athletes do this year around, taking extra precautions such as using special shampoo in the weeks before prom can only help prevent last minute hair style crises and boost confidence. In addition to making sure the hair is prepared to style a new do, using moisturizer and other skin care products after being in pool can help swimmers achieve a healthy and refreshed look. Below are some Swimming World articles that provide additional hair and skin care tips.

Step Four: (Not So Awkward) Prom Photos

Finally, after weeks of preparation and waiting, it’s finally time to relax and enjoy the night! An essential part of any school dance is documenting the evening through photos, silly or otherwise. Over these past few years, a trend had emerged in the swimming community of swimmers posting pictures of themselves flexing or striking poses with their dates or members of their team, recording memories that will last forever.

Step Five: Dance the Night Away!

For swimmers who train day in and day out in pursuit of their goals, prom night can be a good opportunity to let loose and have fun with teammates and friends. Since swimming is such an analytical and quantitative sport, it’s important to remember to take a step back once and a while. Thinking about something other than splits or best times helps you cherish the time in high school while it lasts! Make sure to tear up the dance floor and show off that routine you and your teammates have been practicing for months. We all know swimmers have the best dance moves!

All commentaries are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Swimming World Magazine nor its staff.

1 comment

  1. Carol Inman Greeman

    You missed the last step: Remember you have practice at 5:30 the next morning.