CSCAA: 100 Greatest Women’s College Swimmers & Divers in History (Full Bios Included)

natalie-coughlin-cscaa
Natalie Coughlin. Photo Courtesy: Peter H. Bick

CSCAA Names 100 Greatest Women’s Swimmers & Divers

A total of 642 titles. That is the number of individual NCAA and NAIA championships won by members of the College Swimming & Diving Coaches Association’s (CSCAA) 100 Greatest Swimmers & Divers of the past century. The selections were made as a part of the CSCAA’s 100th-year celebration.

Nearly 3,000 athletes were nominated, with a blue-ribbon panel of current and former college swimmers, coaches, and members of the media making selections from a list of 973 finalists. Eighty-seven swimmers and 13 divers were selected. They hail from 28 states and 13 countries. Highlights of the selections include 12 members of the International Swimming Hall of Fame and 59 Olympians.

Founded in 1922, the College Swimming and Diving Coaches Association of America (CSCAA), is the nation’s first organization of college coaches. The mission of the CSCAA is to advance the sport of swimming and diving with coaches at the epicenter of leadership, advocacy and professional development.

The CSCAA’s 100th birthday celebration will continue with upcoming announcements recognizing Centennial MVP’s for each team along with a listing of the 100 Greatest Coaches, 100 Alumni of Impact. The anniversary will culminate with the Association’s convention and awards banquet, May 2-4, 2022 in Rosemont, Illinois.

The CSCAA 100 list of Greatest College Swimmers and Divers is listed below in alphabetical order. For profiles on each selection visit www.cscaa.org/cscaa100

Top 100 Men’s Swimmers and Divers

Patricia Abt

Kenyon College – Canton, NY
Kenyon’s most prolific female swimmer from 1983 through 1987, Abt was instrumental in taking Kenyon to the first four of the Ladies’ 17-straight national titles. During her career, Abt won 23 of the 28 races she swam at the NCAA Division III Championships and set records in 21 while also gaining 28 All-American honors.

  • National Titles: 1984: 50 Free 23.72, 100 Free 52.32, 200 Free 1:54.17 / 1985: 50 Free 23.68, 100 Free 52.1, 200 Free 1:52.80 / 1986: 50 Free 24.32, 100 Free 52.46 / 1987: 50 Free 23.74, 100 Free 51.55, 200 Free 1:52.41
  • Other: 1987 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 50 Free, 4x Champion 100 Free, 3x Champion 200 Free

Carla Ainsworth

Kenyon College – Knoxville, TN
During her four years, Ainsworth garnered 28 All-American honors, established seven NCAA records, and graduated as the all-time leader in NCAA Division III history with 26 national championships. Ainsworth was unstoppable in the 100 and 200 freestyle, capturing the NCAA title in each of her four years. Ainsworth capped her career by becoming the first-ever three-time CSCAA Division III Swimmer-of-the-Year.

  • National Titles: 1992: 100 Free 51.28, 200 Free 1:51.80 / 1993: 50 Free 23.8, 100 Free 50.94, 200 Free 1:50.75 / 1994: 50 Free 23.74, 100 Free 50.67, 200 Free 1:51.51 / 1995: 50 Free 23.53, 100 Free 50.57, 200 Free 1:49.95
  • Other: 1994, 1995 & 1995 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 50 Free, 4x Champion 100 Free, 4x Champion 200 Free

Gail Amundrud

Arizona State University – Toronto, Canada
Amundrud was an eight-time AIAW Champion highlighted by four individual titles. Amundrud swept the 100 and 200 freestyles at both the 1978 and 1979 AIAW Championships. The 1976 Canadian Olympian helped the Sun Devils claim their eighth national title.

  • National Titles: 1978: 100 Free 51.37, 200 Free 1:48.32 / 1979: 100 Free 51.02, 200 Free 1:48.47

Sarah Bacon

University of Minnesota – Indianapolis, IN
Bacon is a four-time NCAA Champion having captured three 1-meter springboard titles. The eight-time All-American holds the Big Ten record on the 3-meter and the NCAA Championship 1-meter record. Bacon has been named, among other accolades, the 2021 Big Ten Female Athlete-of-the-Year, 2021 CSCAA Women’s Diver-of-the-Year, and the 2021 HONDA Sport Award Winner for Swimming and Diving.

  • National Titles: 2018: 1 Meter 543.5 / 2019: 1 Meter 603.2 / 2021: 1 Meter 557.2, 3 Meter 648.6
  • Other: 2021 Diver of the Year / 3x 1m Champion

Kathleen Baker

University of California – Winston-Salem, NC
A former world record holder in the 100m back, Baker was named the 2017 CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year after winning three individual NCAA titles. A year later, Baker repeated as the 200 backstroke champion. Baker earned a silver medal in the 100 back and gold on the 400 medley relay at the 2016 Olympics and she is an eight-time World Championship medalist.

  • National Titles: 2017: 100 Back 49.84, 200 Back 1:48.44, 200 IM 1:51.69 / 2018: 200 Back 1:47.30
  • Other: 1981 & 1982 NAIA Co-Swimmer of the Year

Melissa Belote

Arizona State University – Washington, DC
One of the Sun Devils’ most decorated swimmers, and the only selection from the District of Columbia, Belote helped bring the AIAW title back to Arizona State in 1977 by sweeping the 200 backstroke and both individual medleys and winning the Broderick (Later Honda Award). Belote added a relay title in 1978 to help the Sun Devils repeat as champions.

  • National Titles: 1976: 100 Back 59.04 / 1977: 200 Back 2:05.08, 200 IM 2:06.02, 400 IM 4:26.35

Lindsay Benko

University of Southern California – Elkhart, IN
Benko, who helped USC to a National Championship team title in 1997, was a five-time NCAA champion, 21-time All-American and reached the NCAA finals in all 12 individual events in which she competed. After winning six Pac-10 titles, Benko was named to the Pac-12 All-Century Team and inducted into the USC hall of fame.

  • National Titles: 1996: 500 Free 4:42.46, 200 Back 1:55.78 / 1997: 500 Free 4:41.85, 200 Back 1:54.42 / 1999: 500 Free 4:40.22

Wendy Boglioli

Monmouth University – Land O Lakes, WI
One of the most decorated athletes in Monmouth University history, Boglioli won three AIAW titles in 1976. At the 1976 Olympic Games, she, along with fellow CSCAA100 selection Jill Sterkel captured gold in the 400 freestyle relay. Boglioli also earned a bronze medal in the 100-meter butterfly and at times held the American Record in the 100-meter freestyle and 100-meter butterfly.

  • National Titles: 1976: 100 Free 52.12, 50 Fly 25.23, 100 Fly 55.6 /
  • Other: 1976 Swimmer of the Year

Rachel Bootsma

University of California – Eden Prarie, MN
Bootsma was a three-time NCAA champion in the 100 back (2013, 2015, 2016) and was a part of two title-winning relay teams, helping Cal to the 2015 NCAA team title. An Academic All-American, Bootsma was a member of the 2012 Olympic team, winning a gold medal in the 400 medley relay.

  • National Titles: 2013: 100 Back 50.13 / 2015: 100 Back 50.03 / 2016: 100 Back 50.28
  • Other: 3x 100 Back Champion

Maggie Bowen

Auburn University – Jackson, MS
A three-time SEC Swimmer-of-the-Year, Bowen captained Auburn’s NCAA championship teams in 2002 and 2003. She was a six-time individual NCAA champion, sweeping the 200 and 400 individual medleys for three straight years. A 16-time SEC champion, Bowen also earned six international medals, highlighted by 200-meter individual medley gold at the 2001 World Championships.

  • National Titles: 2001: 200 IM 1:55.49, 400 IM 4:07.26 / 2002: 200 IM 1:53.91, 400 IM 4:04.69 / 2003: 200 IM 1:55.33, 400 IM 4:06.15
  • Other: 3x Champion 200 IM, 3x Champion 400 IM

Elaine Breeden

Stanford University – Lexington, KY
A three-time national champion in the 200 butterfly, Breeden ended her career with four national titles. She added seven Pac-10 titles and 24 All-America honors, while leading the Cardinals to a runner-up finish at the 2010 NCAA Championships. Breeden represented Team USA at the 2008 Olympics in both the 100 and 200 butterfly events.

  • National Titles: 2007: 200 Fly 1:53.02 / 2009: 200 Fly 1:50.98 / 2010: 100 Fly 51.43, 200 Fly 1:52.39
  • Other: 3x Champion 200 Fly

Tami Bruce

University of Florida – Chula Vista, CA
Bruce was a seven-time NCAA national champion and twelve-time All-American. Between 1986 and 1988 Bruce was undefeated in the 1650 at the SEC and NCAA Championships. The 1988 SEC Swimmer-of-the-Year, Bruce helped the Gators to four consecutive SEC team titles.

  • National Titles: 1986: 500 Free 4:40.87, 1650 Free 15:56.81 / 1987: 1650 Free 16:02.15 / 1988: 200 Free 1:45.40, 500 Free 4:38.22, 1650 Free 15:50.86
  • Other: 3x Champion 1650 Free

Kelci Bryant

University of Minnesota – Chatham, IL
Bryant was a two-time NCAA Champion winning the 3-meter in 2020 and the 1-meter in 2011, and was a two-time Olympian, earning a silver medal in the synchronized 3-meter springboard in London in 2012. Still the school record holder on the 1-meter, Bryant was a four-time All-American, four-time Big Ten champion, and the 2011 CSCAA Diver-of-the-Year.

  • National Titles: 2010: 3 Meter 655.5 / 2011: 1 Meter 549.65
  • Other: 2011 Diver of the Year

Loni Burton

California State University-Bakersfield – Cupertino, CA
Burton captured a dozen individual titles in just three seasons and a 13th as part of CSUB’s winning 400 freestyle relay team in 2004. She remains the most decorated student-athletes in CSUB history with three CSCAA Division II Swimmer-of-the-Year accolades to her credit. Burton still holds school records in the 50, 100, and 200 freestyles. Burton’s father, Mike is a member of the CSCAA 100 Greatest Swimmers.

  • National Titles: 2003: 50 Free 23.13, 100 Free 49.92, 200 Free 1:48.92, 100 Fly 54.4 / 2004: 50 Free 23.01, 100 Free 49.62, 200 Free 1:48.14, 100 Fly 54.03
  • Other: 2003, 2004 & 2005 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year

Patricia Castro Ortega

Queens University of Charlotte – Madrid, Spain
Castro-Ortega set the bar high for the Royals swimming program as the 2014 and 2015 CSCAA and Bluegrass Mountain Conference Swimmer-of-the-Year, setting three NCAA records on her way to ten individual NCAA titles. She was recognized as an All-American in nine events, including consecutive honors in the 200 individual medley, 500 freestyle, 800 freestyle relay, 100 freestyle, and 400 freestyle relay.

  • National Titles: 2015: 100 Free 48.92, 200 Free 1:45.27, 500 Free 4:43.37, 200 IM 1:58.60 / 2016: 100 Free 48.54, 500 Free 4:39.28, 200 IM 1:55.63, 400 IM 4:08.56
  • Other: 2015 & 2016 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year

Tracy Caulkins

University of Florida – Nashville, TN
Arguably the greatest women’s swimmer in history, Caulkins finished her collegiate career with 12 individual NCAA titles, the most of any Division I swimmer. As a freshman, Caulkins won five individual events, a record that, given current rules, guarantees the Gator’s record will stand indefinitely. Caulkins was a three-time Honda-Broderick Award winner.

  • National Titles: 1982: 100 Fly 53.91, 200 Fly 1:57.23, 100 IM 55.74, 200 IM 2:00.77, 400 IM 4:12.64 / 1983: 100 IM 56.09, 200 IM 2:00.34, 400 IM 4:15.24 / 1984: 100 Breast 1:01.37, 200 Fly 1:55.55, 200 IM 1:57.06, 400 IM 4:08.37
  • Other: 1982 & 1984 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 200 IM, 3x Champion 400 IM

Jeanne Childs

University of Hawaii – Denver, CO
Childs, who swam for UH from 1981-83 captured the first four NCAA titles awarded in the breaststroke events. Childs later went on to break the American record in the 200-meter breaststroke at the U.S. trials for the World Swimming Championships.

  • National Titles: 1982: 100 Breast 1:02.08, 200 Breast 2:11.90 / 1983: 100 Breast 1:02.69, 200 Breast 2:13.35

Mallory Comerford

University of Louisville – Kalamazoo, MI
A two-time ACC Swimmer-of-the-Year, Comerford was a part of three consecutive titles in the 200 freestyle and added a fourth victory when she captured the 100 freestyle as a senior. She solidified herself as a ten-time individual All-American and 16-time relay All-American and was named USA Swimming’s 2017 Golden Goggle Award winner for Breakout Performer-of-the-Year.

  • National Titles: 2017: 200 Free 1:40.36 / 2018: 200 Free 1:39.80 / 2019: 100 Free 46.26, 200 Free 1:40.26
  • Other: 3x Champion 200 Free

Maritza Correia

University of Georgia – Valrico, FL
Maritza Correia earned 27 All-America citations and won five individual and six relay NCAA championships. By the time of graduation, she held two NCAA and American records, thus becoming the first Black woman to do so. Correia also earned 15 SEC Championships including individual wins in every freestyle distance. In 2004 she won an Olympic silver medal in the 400-meter freestyle relay.

  • National Titles: 2000: 200m Free 1:57.33 / 2002: 50 Free 21.69, 100 Free 47.56 / 2003: 50 Free 21.83, 100 Free 47.29

Natalie Coughlin

University of California – Concord, CA
Coughlin captured 12 individual NCAA titles and twelve more Olympic medals over her storied career. She was a three-time Pac-12 Swimmer-of-the-Year and two-time recipient of the Honda Sports Award for swimming. Coughlin was also the 2003 Women’s Sports Foundation Sportswoman-of-the-Year, the 2002 USA Swimming Athlete-of-the-Year, and the 2002 Swimming World female World Swimmer-of-the-Year.

  • National Titles: 2001: 100 Back 51.23, 200 Back 1:51.02, 100 Fly 51.18 / 2002: 100 Back 49.97, 200 Back 1:49.52, 100 Fly 50.01 / 2003: 100 Back 50.92, 200 Back 1:50.86, 100 Fly 50.62 / 2004: 100m Back 57.51, 100m Fly 56.88
  • Other: 2001, 2002 & 2003 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Back, 4x Champion 100 Fly, 3x Champion 200 Back

Kirsty Coventry

Auburn University – Harare, Zimbabwe
From 2003 to 2005, Coventry led the Auburn women program to three consecutive NCAA championships. She was named Swimmer-of-the-Year by both the SEC and CSCAA following a season that saw her establish new NCAA records in the 200 backstroke, 400 individual medley and 200 individual medley. Coventry’s seven Olympic medals make her the most decorated Olympian from Africa.

  • National Titles: 2004: 200m Back 2:03.86 / 2005: 200 Back 1:50.54, 200 IM 1:54.37, 400 IM 4:04.48
  • Other: 2005 Swimmer of the Year

Mary DeScenza

University of Georgia – Naperville, IL
With an NCAA record in 2006, DeScenza became just the second woman to sweep the 200 butterfly in each of her four years. DeScenza raced to NCAA titles in six individual and eight relay events including four of the Bulldogs’ five winning relays in 2005. She added 15 SEC Championships and was awarded the 2006 Honda Sports Award for Swimming & Diving.

  • National Titles: 2003: 200 Fly 1:53.51 / 2004: 200m Fly 2:06.02 / 2005: 100 Fly 52.11, 200 Fly 1:54.19 / 2006: 100 Fly 51.56, 200 Fly 1:53.78
  • Other: 4x Champion 200 Fly

Ella Eastin

Stanford University – Irvine, CA
Eastin became the first woman in NCAA history to win four straight titles in the 400 individual medley. As a freshman she set an American record in the 200 individual medley and a year later did the same in the 400 individual medley. In 2018 she was named CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year after capturing the 200 butterfly and setting American records in both medleys.

  • National Titles: 2016: 200 IM 1:51.65, 400 IM 3:58.40 / 2017: 200 Fly 1:51.35, 400 IM 3:57.57 / 2018: 200 Fly 1:50.01, 200 IM 1:50.67, 400 IM 3:54.60 / 2019: 400 IM 3:57.03
  • Other: 2018 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 400 IM

Janet Evans

Stanford University – Placentia, CA
An eight-time All-American, Evans dominated the distance events in her brief Stanford career. She swept the 500 and 1650 freestyles in 1990 and 1991 and added a 400 individual medley title in 1990. Her trademark windmill stroke carried her to two Olympic teams and four Gold medals. Her American record of 15:39.14 in the 1650 freestyle stood for an amazing 22 years.

  • National Titles: 1990: 500 Free 4:34.39, 1650 Free 15:39.14, 400 IM 4:07.59 / 1991: 500 Free 4:38.71, 1650 Free 15:45.98
  • Other: 1990 Swimmer of the Year

Julie Farrell-Ovenhouse

Michigan State University – Holt, MI
Growing up in the shadow of Michigan State, Farrell-Ovenhouse was coached throughout her high school and college career by John Narcy and captured two NCAA and four Big Ten springboard titles. Farrell-Ovenhouse was the 1990 CSCAA Diver-of-the-Year and 1991 Big Ten Jesse Owens Athlete-of-the-Year and represented the United States at the 1992 Olympic Games.

  • National Titles: 1990: 1 Meter 455.7 / 1991: 3 Meter 576.8
  • Other: 1990 Diver of the Year

Leigh Ann Fetter

University of Texas – Louisville, KY
In 1990, Fetter became the first woman to swim the 50 freestyle under 22 seconds en route to the fourth of seven NCAA titles. Her time of 21.92 stood as the Longhorn record for over a quarter century. Over the course of her career, she never lost a 50 freestyle and helped Texas to NCAA titles in 1988, 1990 and 1991. The 1988 Olympian received the 1991 Honda Sports Award for Swimming and Diving.

  • National Titles: 1988: 50 Free 22.38 / 1989: 50 Free 22.05, 100 Free 48.68 / 1990: 50 Free 22.11, 100 Free 48.48 / 1991: 50 Free 22.13, 100 Free 48.29
  • Other: 4x Champion 50 Free, 3x Champion 100 Free

Catherine Fox

Stanford University – Roeland Park, KS
Fox was a 28-time All-American during her career, tied for the most in Stanford history. She won five individual and five relay NCAA titles, including three straight in the 50 freestyle. She added a pair of 100 backstroke championships, setting an American record with her second. Fox was also a member of two gold-winning relay teams at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta.

  • National Titles: 1997: 50 Free 22.01, 100 Back 53.23 / 1998: 50 Free 22.21, 100 Back 52.71 / 1999: 50 Free 22.13
  • Other: 3x Champion 50 Free

Missy Franklin

University of California – Centennial, CO
In 2015, Franklin was named the Pac-12 Swimmer-of-the-Year, CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year, CoSIDA Academic All-American-of-the-Year, and winner of the Honda Cup as the top collegiate female athlete. A two-time Olympian and six-time medalist, Franklin swept three events at the 2015 NCAA Championships to go along with five Olympic medals and seventeen World Championship Medals.

  • National Titles: 2014: 200 Free 1:40.31 / 2015: 200 Free 1:39.10, 200 Back 1:47.91, 200 IM 1:52.11
  • Other: 2015 Swimmer of the Year

Nicole Haislett

University of Florida – Saint Petersburg, FL
Haislett won NCAA titles in three different events including a four-year streak in the 500 freestyle. In her four years, she was undefeated in SEC competition and was recognized as the SEC Female Swimmer-of-the-Year for four consecutive years from 1991 to 1994, and the SEC Female Athlete-of-the-Year (all sports) in 1993 and 1994.

  • National Titles: 1991: 200 Free 1:45.05 / 1992: 200 Free 1:43.28 / 1993: 200 Free 1:43.98, 200 IM 1:57.15 / 1994: 200 Free 1:44.51, 500 Free 4:43.36
  • Other: 4x Champion 200 Free

Lourette Hakansson

Drury University – Boras, Sweden
Hakansson was the first female swimmer to win twelve individual national titles in twelve attempts. Over the course of her career, she swept the 200 breaststroke, 200 individual medley, 400 individual medley, and NAIA Swimmer-of-the-Year honors. Hakansson’s efforts helped propel the Panthers to national titles in 1992, 1993, and 1994.

  • National Titles: 1991: 200 Breast 2:20.28, 200 IM 2:05.57, 400 IM 4:25.94 / 1992: 200 Breast 2:17.38, 200 IM 2:05.51, 400 IM 4:27.75 / 1993: 200 Breast 2:14.90, 200 IM 2:04.21, 400 IM 4:24.03 / 1994: 200 Breast 2:18.22, 200 IM 2:05.74, 400 IM 4:29.00
  • Other: 1991, 1992, 1993 & 1994 NAIA Co-Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 200 Breast, 4x Champion 200 IM, 4x Champion 400 IM

Blythe Hartley

University of Southern California – Edmonton, Canada
Hartley was a five-time NCAA Champion diver while competing at USC, reaching the finals of every NCAA event in which she competed as a Trojan. The 12-time All-American was named the CSCAA and Pac-10 Diver-of-the-Year a record three times and selected to the Pac-12 All-Century Team.

  • National Titles: 2002: 1 Meter 350.85, Platform 460.35 / 2005: 3 Meter 586.15 / 2006: 1 Meter 353.5, 3 Meter 373.15
  • Other: 2002, 2005 & 2006 Diver of the Year

Amy Heasley

Kenyon College – Nicholasville, KY
Despite never training with a high school team, Amy Heasley emerged as one of the most successful swimmers in NCAA swimming and diving history. She captured four individual NCAA titles in 1986 and completed her career with nine individual and 13 relay titles. A 28-time All-American, Heasley set eleven NCAA Division III records in her career.

  • National Titles: 1985: 200 Fly 2:09.22 / 1986: 100 Fly 57.96, 200 Fly 2:07.57, 200 IM 2:10.74, 400 IM 4:35.82 / 1987: 100 Fly 56.73, 200 Fly 2:03.76, 200 IM 2:08.47 / 1988: 200 Fly 2:03.74
  • Other: 4x Champion 200 Fly

Katinka Hosszu

University of Southern California – Pecs, Hungary
A 2011 Honda Award Winner and CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year, Hosszu won five NCAA titles and was a seven-time individual conference champion. In addition to being a five-time school record holder and 20-time All-American, Hosszu was named the 2011 Pac-10 Women’s Swimmer-of-the-Year and was a nominee for Best Female College Athlete of 2011 at the ESPYs.

  • National Titles: 2011: 200 Fly 1:51.69, 200 IM 1:53.39, 400 IM 3:59.75 / 2012: 200 Fly 1:51.32, 400 IM 3:56.54
  • Other: 2011 Swimmer of the Year

Misty Hyman

Stanford University – Mesa, AZ
A two-time Honda Sports Award winner in Swimming and Diving, Hyman collected five individual and seven relay titles at the NCAA Championships. Her sweep of the 200 backstroke and both butterfly events powered the Cardinal to the 1998 team title. In 2000, Hyman captured gold in the 200-meter butterfly, snapping Susie O’Neil’s undefeated six-year run in the event

  • National Titles: 1998: 200 Back 1:53.12, 100 Fly 51.34, 200 Fly 1:55.70 / 1999: 100 Fly 51.77 / 2001: 200 Fly 1:53.63
  • Other: 1998 Swimmer of the Year

Vera Ilyina

University of Texas – Moscow, Russia
A two-time CSCAA Diver-of-the-Year, Ilyina was a four-time NCAA Champion, sweeping both the 1-meter and 3-meter NCAA titles in 1997 and 1998. She was named the Big 12 Female Athlete-of-the-Year in 1998 and was the 1997 and 1998 Big 12 Diver-of-the-Year. A four-time Olympian for Russia, she won two medals in the 3-meter springboard synchronized diving event.

  • National Titles: 1997: 1 Meter 455.9, 3 Meter 587.8 / 1998: 1 Meter 495.7, 3 Meter 612.6
  • Other: 1997 & 1998 Diver of the Year

Carrie Irish

The University of Ohio State
Irish is one of three Buckeye divers to earn All-America laurels in each of her four years and the first female diver to compete for four years at OSU. A seven-time national champion, she posted an undefeated campaign in 1975 en route to claiming AIAW and Big Ten titles on both springboards. Irish also captured the 1976 AIAW title on the 1-meter and the 1978 and 1979 Big Ten titles on the 3-meter.

  • National Titles: 1975: 1 Meter 434.7, 3 Meter 442.15 / 1976: 1 Meter 433
  • Other: 1975 Diver of the Year

Christine Jarvis

University of Alabama – Bedford, Great Britain
Jarvis was Alabama’s first female individual national champion in any sport and still holds the record for most individual national titles in Crimson Tide. Jarvis captured six AIAW titles, sweeping the 50, 100, and 200 breaststrokes in 1976 and 1977. Jarvis represented England in the 1972 and 1976 Olympics.

  • National Titles: 1976: 100 Breast 1:04.56, 200 Breast 2:18.79, 50 Breast 30.05 / 1977: 100 Breast 1:05.08, 200 Breast 2:20.08, 50 Breast 30.22

Elizabeth Jex

Williams College – Alexandria, VA
Jex was the first superstar of Division III women’s swimming. The sprinter and natural leader swept the 50 and 100 freestyles in each of her four years and totaled twelve individual NCAA titles. Her efforts culminated in a pair of CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year honors and Williams’ first two NCAA team titles.

  • National Titles: 1980: 50 Free 24.72, 100 Free 52.8, 100 IM 1:00.68 / 1981: 50 Free 24.78, 100 Free 53.47, 100 IM 1:00.89 / 1982: 50 Free 24.76, 100 Free 53.85, 200 Free 1:57.39, 100 Fly 1:00.67 / 1983: 50 Free 24.44, 100 Free 52.98
  • Other: 1982 & 1983 Division 3 Co-Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 50 Free, 4x Champion 100 Free

Linda Jezek

Stanford University – Palo Alto, CA
A Palo Alto native, Jezek captured five titles for her hometown Cardinal. At the 1979 AIAW Championships she swept the 50, 100 and 200 backstrokes in 1979. A year later her wins in the 100 and 200 backstroke helped Stanford edge Texas 629-623 for their first team championship. Jezek was a member of the silver medal 400 medley relay at the 1976 Olympics and later set the world record in the 200-meter backstroke.

  • National Titles: 1979: 50 Back 26, 100 Back 56.09, 200 Back 1:59.23 / 1980: 100 Back 55.75, 200 Back 1:58.61

Diane Johannigman

University of Houston – Cincinnati, OH
Johannigman was the first Houston Cougar to win a national championship and the first athlete to win three consecutive titles as she swept the 200 butterfly at the AIAW Championships in 1978, 1979, and 1980. In total, Johannigman earned nineteen All-American honors and captured four national titles.

  • National Titles: 1978: 100 Fly 55.17, 200 Fly 1:59.08 / 1979: 200 Fly 1:59.42 / 1980: 200 Fly 1:57.88
  • Other: 3x Champion 200 Fly

Jenna Johnson

Stanford University – Santa Rosa, CA
A sprint specialist, Johnson was named CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year in 1986 after sweeping the 50 and 100 freestyle and 100 butterfly. She added three other individual titles in those events and added four relay national titles and was named All-American 14 times. Johnson earned three relay golds at the 1984 Olympics and was named Honda Sports Award Winner for swimming and diving in 1986.

  • National Titles: 1986: 50 Free 22.46, 100 Free 49.03, 100 Fly 52.69 / 1987: 50 Free 22.57, 100 Free 48.82 / 1989: 100 Fly 53.24
  • Other: 1986 Swimmer of the Year

Janel Jorgensen

Stanford University – Ridgefield, CT
Over her career Jorgensen won five individual NCAA titles, earned twenty-seven All-America honors and helped Stanford win ten relays. She was named CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year and Honda Sports Award winner for swimming and diving in 1993. Prior to her arrival at Stanford, she helped Team USA capture silver in the 400-meter medley relay at the 1988 Olympics.

  • National Titles: 1990: 100 Fly 53.02, 200 Fly 1:55.75, 200 IM 1:58.17 / 1993: 100 Fly 53.19, 200 Fly 1:57.43
  • Other: 1993 Swimmer of the Year

Kara Lynn Joyce

University of Georgia – Ann Arbor, MI
A two-time CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year, Joyce captured 18 NCAA Championships (nine relays, nine individual) over her career. As a sophomore, she helped Georgia recapture the NCAA team title and helped the Bulldogs become the first team to win all five relays. In 2006, Joyce became the first women’s NCAA swimmer to win the 50, 100, and 200 freestyles.

  • National Titles: 2004: 50m Free 24.24, 100m Free 53.15 / 2005: 50 Free 21.97, 100 Free 47.5 / 2006: 50 Free 21.63, 100 Free 47.41, 200 Free 1:43.96 / 2007: 50 Free 21.71, 100 Free 47.24
  • Other: 2006 & 2007 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 50 Free, 4x Champion 100 Free

Lilly King

Indiana University – Evansville, IN
The first woman to win eight NCAA breaststroke titles, King dominated during her collegiate career at Indiana University, setting records in both the 100 and, at the time, the 200 breaststroke. Over four seasons, the two-time Olympian won nine Big Ten Championships and earned All-America accolades in eight breaststroke events and eight relay events.

  • National Titles: 2016: 100 Breast 56.85, 200 Breast 2:03.59 / 2017: 100 Breast 56.71, 200 Breast 2:03.18 / 2018: 100 Breast 56.25, 200 Breast 2:02.60 / 2019: 100 Breast 55.73, 200 Breast 2:02.90
  • Other: 2016 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Breast, 4x Champion 200 Breast

Tara Kirk

Stanford University – Bremerton, WA
Kirk is the first swimmer to win an NCAA title in the 100 breaststroke for four consecutive years. That span included a perfect 35 wins in 35 races. Her record in the 200 breaststroke was nearly as perfect and highlighted by three consecutive NCAA titles. The three-time captain was also a part of four NCAA Championship relays and won fifteen medals in major international competitions.

  • National Titles: 2001: 100 Breast 59.18 / 2002: 100 Breast 59.03, 200 Breast 2:07.36 / 2003: 100 Breast 58.62, 200 Breast 2:08.79 / 2004: 100m Breast 1:04.79, 200m Breast 2:20.70
  • Other: 2004 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Breast, 3x Champion 200 Breast

Kristy Kowal

University of Georgia – Wyomissing, PA
Kowal was a seven-time NCAA champion for the Lady Bulldogs, capturing the 100 and 200 breaststrokes three times each. An Olympic silver-medalist at the Sydney Olympics, she claimed 16 SEC titles, was chosen as the NCAA Woman-of-the-Year, and received the Top VIII Award for her accomplishments in the pool, in the classroom, and in the community.

  • National Titles: 1998: 100 Breast 59.05, 200 Breast 2:09.14 / 1999: 100 Breast 59.25, 200 Breast 2:07.66 / 2000: 100m Breast 1:05.74, 200m Breast 2:22.05, 200m IM 2:10.69
  • Other: 3x Champion 100 Breast, 3x Champion 200 Breast

Mitzi Kremer

Clemson University – Titusville, FL
Kremer was a two-time ACC Champion, capturing back-to-back NCAA titles in the 200 and 500 freestyle all while helping the Tigers to three consecutive ACC Championships. She was a 16-time All-American and a five-time ACC Champion and was the first female swimmer to be inducted into the Clemson Hall of Fame.

  • National Titles: 1987: 200 Free 1:45.99, 500 Free 4:41.13 / 1989: 200 Free 1:44.78, 500 Free 4:39.18

Michelle Langsford

Drury University / College of the Ozarks – Springfield, MO
Splitting her career between Ozarks and Drury, Langsford earned 21 NAIA All-American honors and captured fourteen NAIA titles, including five in 1984. When she transferred to Drury, Langsford was the only woman on the team, and in 1984 and 1985, as a team of one, single-handedly lifted the Panthers to a pair of top-ten finishes.

  • National Titles: 1982: 100m Breast 1:17.99, 100m IM 1:09.08 / 1983: 50 Free 24.54, 100 Breast 1:09.28, 100 IM 1:02.08 / 1984: 50 Free 24.01, 100 Free 52.39, 200 Free 1:54.52, 100 Breast 1:07.86, 100 IM 1:00.63 / 1985: 50 Free 23.57, 100 Free 51.69, 100 Breast 1:06.31, 200 Breast 2:26.00
  • Other: 1984 & 1985 NAIA Swimmer of the Year

Breeja Larson

Texas A&M University – Mesa, AZ
Twice named SEC Swimmer-of-the-Year, Larson won three-straight NCAA titles in the 100 breaststroke, setting American, US Open, and SEC records five times. She captured seven conference titles as she helped the Aggies transition to the SEC. Larson won gold as a member of the 400 medley relay at the 2012 Olympic Games and 2013 World Championships.

  • National Titles: 2012: 100 Breast 57.71 / 2013: 100 Breast 57.63 / 2014: 100 Breast 57.23
  • Other: 3x Champion 100 Breast

Katie Ledecky

Stanford University – Bethesda, MD
In addition to being one of two freshmen to win the Honda Cup Award, Ledecky owns NCAA records in the 500 freestyle, 1650 freestyle and 800 freestyle relay. She won five individual NCAA titles in only two years of college swimming, and had nine All-America honors in her career. Ledecky is the most-decorated female swimmer in history with seven Olympic and 15 World Championship gold medals.

  • National Titles: 2017: 200 Free 1:40.36, 500 Free 4:24.06, 1650 Free 15:07.70 / 2018: 500 Free 4:26.57, 1650 Free 15:07.57

Valerie Lee

Stanford University – Cincinnati, OH
Long before Katie Ledecky, Janet Evans and Marybeth Linzmeier, Stanford’s preeminent distance swimmer was Valerie Lee. Lee was a 13-time All-American highlighted by four individual titles. Lee earned silver in the 200-meter-butterfly at the 1975 World Championships, where she also added a fourth-place finish in the 200 freestyle.

  • National Titles: 1977: 500 Free 4:50.16, 1650 Free 16:28.45, 200 Fly 2:01.38 / 1978: 1650 Free 16:22.21 /

Caitlin Leverenz

University of California – Tucson, AZ
A three-time individual and three-time relay NCAA champion, Leverenz earned the 2012 Pac-12 Swimmer-of-the-Year and was the recipient of the Honda Sports Award for swimming. In 2013, coming off a bronze-medal performance at the Olympic Games, Leverenz was named the Pac-12 women’s swimming Scholar-Athlete-of-the-Year for women’s swimming.

  • National Titles: 2012: 200 Breast 2:04.76, 200 IM 1:51.77 / 2013: 200 IM 1:53.39
  • Other: 2012 Swimmer of the Year

Kim Linehan

University of Texas – Sarasota, FL
Linehan was a dominant middle distance and distance freestyler, winning six individual AIAW event titles and earning 20 All-American honors. A two-time Olympian, she helped lead the Longhorns to the 1981 and 1982 AIAW National titles. Linehan held the world record in the 1,500-meter freestyle from 1979-1987 and was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1997.

  • National Titles: 1981: 500 Free 4:42.33, 1650 Free 15:58.50, 200 Fly 1:58.68 / 1982: 500 Free 4:44.12, 1650 Free 16:18.50, 200 Fly 2:00.21

Marybeth Linzmeier

Stanford University – Mission Viejo, CA
Linzmeier won eight individual national championships (and eleven total) while with the Cardinal. She swept the 200, 500, and 1650 freestyles in both 1982 and 1984 and won three straight in the latter two. Her efforts helped Stanford to the 1983 NCAA title and was a multiple-event qualifier for the boycotted 1980 Olympics in Moscow.

  • National Titles: 1982: 200 Free 1:45.82, 500 Free 4:41.61, 1650 Free 16:02.34 / 1983: 500 Free 4:39.95, 1650 Free 16:03.76 / 1984: 200 Free 1:45.47, 500 Free 4:38.91, 1650 Free 16:02.38
  • Other: 3x Champion 1650 Free

Noemi Lung

Florida Atlantic University – Baia Mare, Roumania
The 1993 CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year, Lung’s career was highlighted by eight individual titles including a pair of three-year reigns in both the 200 and 400 individual medleys. In 1992 she received the Honda Award for excellence in sports and in 1988 and 1992 she represented Romania in the Olympic Games.

  • National Titles: 1991: 200 IM 2:04.07, 400 IM 4:20.68 / 1992: 200 Breast 2:21.24, 200 IM 2:03.62, 400 IM 4:23.26 / 1993: 200 Back 2:02.72, 200 IM 2:03.25, 400 IM 4:23.26
  • Other: 1993 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 200 IM, 3x Champion 400 IM

Simone Manuel

Stanford University – Sugar Land, TX
The first woman to break 46 seconds in the 100 freestyle, Manuel led the Cardinal to NCAA team titles in 2017 and 2018. A 14-time NCAA champion, highlighted by six individual titles, she holds NCAA records in the 100 freestyle and 800 freestyle relay. A five-time Olympic medalist, Manuel became the first female Black American swimmer to win an individual Olympic gold.

  • National Titles: 2015: 50 Free 21.32, 100 Free 46.09 / 2017: 50 Free 21.17, 100 Free 45.56 / 2018: 50 Free 21.18, 100 Free 45.65
  • Other: 3x Champion 50 Free, 3x Champion 100 Free

Mary Meagher

University of California – Louisville, KY
Meagher was ahead of her time in the butterfly events, with her performances from her era still highly competitive today. In addition to earning NCAA championship accolades, Meagher won the 100 butterfly and 200 butterfly at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, and added a bronze medal at the 1988 Games in Seoul.

  • National Titles: 1983: 200 Fly 1:56.71 / 1985: 100 Fly 53.5, 200 Fly 1:55.13 / 1986: 200 Fly 1:54.52 / 1987: 100 Fly 52.42, 200 Fly 1:55.54
  • Other: 4x Champion 200 Fly

Suzanne Melody

Simon Fraser University – Rockville, MD
Melody won an NAIA record five individual national titles (100, 200, 1500 freestyle, 100 butterfly, and 200 backstroke), setting records in every race. She was twice named Outstanding Performer and led SFU to the 1985 NAIA team championship as a senior, finishing her career second on the NAIA’s all-time individual titles list.

  • National Titles: 1982: 100m Free 59.26, 200m Free 2:08.30, 1500m Free 17:11.09, 200m Back 2:31.70, 100m Fly 1:06.02 / 1983: 200 Free 1:55.15, 500 Free 5:09.29, 1650 Free 17:31.94, 200 Fly 2:07.96 / 1985: 200 Free 1:53.38, 200 IM 2:10.92, 400 IM 4:41.11
  • Other: 1982 & 1983 NAIA Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 200 Free

Betsy Mitchell

University of Texas – Marietta, OH
Mitchell was a seven-time individual NCAA champion and 20-time All-American who helped guide Texas to three NCAA team titles. A two-time Honda Sport Award finalist, she was named the 1980’s Southwest Conference Swimmer of the Decade. Mitchell twice represented the United States in the Olympics and was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1998.

  • National Titles: 1986: 100 Back 55, 200 Back 1:57.26 / 1987: 100 Back 54.18, 200 Back 1:55.16, 200 IM 1:59.66 / 1988: 100 Back 54.11, 200 Back 1:57.21
  • Other: 1987 Swimmer of the Year / 3x 100 Back Champion, 3x Champion 200 Back

Martina Moravcova

Southern Methodist University – Piestany, Slovakia
Moravcova was the driving force behind SMU’s dominant teams in the late 1990’s. A two-time CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year, Moravcova won 10 individual NCAA titles in 12 attempts, placing her third all-time among Division I women’s swimmers. A five-time Olympic Medalist, she won a dozen individual conference titles and helped the Mustangs to four NCAA relay titles.

  • National Titles: 1996: 200 Free 1:44.64 / 1997: 100 Free 48.18, 200 Free 1:43.08, 200 IM 1:55.81 / 1998: 100 Free 48.81, 200 Free 1:45.11, 200 IM 1:57.37 / 1999: 100 Free 48.05, 200 Free 1:43.84, 200 IM 1:55.64
  • Other: 1997 & 1999 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 100 Free, 4x Champion 200 Free, 3x Champion 200 IM

Beata Nelson

University of Wisconsin – Madison, WI
Swimming for her hometown Badgers, Nelson was named the 2019 CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year after breaking NCAA records in the 100 and 200 backstroke. The two-time Big Ten Swimmer-of-the-Year was unable to repeat the feat following the cancellation of the 2020 NCAA Championships leaving her with seven All-American honors.

  • National Titles: 2019: 100 Back 49.18, 200 Back 1:47.24, 200 IM 1:50.79 /
  • Other: 2019 Swimmer of the Year

Megan Neyer

University of Florida – Ashland, KY
Individually, Neyer won a record eight NCAA diving championships, sweeping the one-meter and three-meter springboard events in each of her four years. Neyer was recognized as an Academic All-American in 1983 and 1986 and was awarded an NCAA Postgraduate scholarship. She is a member of the International Swimming Hall of Fame.

  • National Titles: 1982: 1 Meter 481.95, 3 Meter 541.95 / 1983: 1 Meter 495.85, 3 Meter 497.4 / 1984: 1 Meter 450.4, 3 Meter 498.05 / 1986: 1 Meter 480.7, 3 Meter 532.35
  • Other: 1982, 1983, 1984 &1986 Diver of the Year / 4x 1m Champion, 4x Champioin 3 Meter

Bailee Nunn

Drury University – Springfield, MO
Nunn was the 2018 CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year after winning national in the 100 and 200 breaststrokes, 100 butterfly, and 200 individual medley. She earned ten national championships in her career despite earning only one in 2020 when the national meet was canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic.

  • National Titles: 2017: 200 Breast 2:09.12, 200 IM 1:56.51 / 2018: 100 Breast 59.89, 200 Breast 2:10.90, 100 Fly 53.01, 200 IM 1:57.55 / 2019: 100 Breast 59.94, 200 Breast 2:09.67, 200 IM 1:57.97 / 2020: 50 Free 22.36
  • Other: 2018 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 200 Breast, 3x Champion 200 IM

Elizabeth Olsen

Colorado College – Leawood, KS
Olsen is the most-decorated diver in NCAA Division III history. She swept both the 1- and 3-meter springboard titles in both 1986 and 1987. She then spent the 1988 season studying abroad in Yugoslavia before returning to recapture the 1-meter springboard again in 1990. She finished her career as a six-time All-American.

  • National Titles: 1986: 1 Meter, 3 Meter / 1987: 1 Meter, 3 Meter / 1990 1-Meter
  • Other: 1986 & 1987 Division 3 Diver of the Year / 3x 1m Champion

Yulia Pakhalina

University of Houston – Penza, Russia
In just three years at Houston, Pakhalina was undefeated on the 3-meter springboard highlighted by three individual NCAA Championships. In both 2001 and 2003, the three-time Olympian swept both boards, earning CSCAA Diver-of-the-Year awards both times.

  • National Titles: 2001: 1 Meter 329.6, 3 Meter 573.2 / 2002: 3 Meter 625.05 / 2003: 1 Meter 339.7, 3 Meter 657.3
  • Other: 2001 & 2003 Diver of the Year / 3x Champion 3 Meter

Lindsay Payne

Williams College – Charlotte, NC
Payne took breaststroke in Division III to a new level. She captured seven individual event titles for the Ephs and repeatedly shattered Division III marks in both breaststroke events.. All told, the Olympic Trials finalist cut more than two full seconds in the 100 breaststroke and four full seconds in the 200 breaststroke from the Division III records.

  • National Titles: 2002: 100 Breast 1:04.46 / 2003: 100 Breast 1:04.30 / 2005: 100 Breast 1:02.88, 200 Breast 2:16.45 / 2006: 100 Breast 1:01.41, 200 Breast 2:14.20, 200 IM 2:03.14
  • Other: 2005 & 2006 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Breast

Joan Pennington

University of Texas – Franklin, TN
Pennington was Texas’ first great varsity women’s swimmer winning six individual NCAA and AIAW event titles, earning 28 All-America awards and helping the Longhorns to their first-ever NCAA Women’s Swimming & Diving Championship. A two-time World Championship medalist and 1978 Honda Sport Award-winner for Swimming & Diving.

  • National Titles: 1979: 50 Fly 25.31, 100 Fly 54.44, 100 IM 56.24, 200 IM 2:00.08 / 1980: 100 IM 56.51 / 1984: 100 Fly 53.7
  • Other: 1979 Swimmer of the Year

Kathryn Petrock

Kenyon College – Ann Arbor, MI
An elite swimmer on four national championship teams, Katie Petrock piled up a total of two dozen All-America awards. The 1997 CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year, Petrock captured three titles in both 200 and 400 individual medleys and two more in the 200 backstroke. In total, she collected eighteen national titles in helping the Ladies to four consecutive NCAA Division III team titles.

  • National Titles: 1994: 200 IM 2:05.88, 400 IM 4:28.37 / 1995: 200 Back 2:06.13 / 1996: 200 IM 2:07.95, 400 IM 4:26.99 / 1997: 200 Back 2:02.63, 200 IM 2:04.25, 400 IM 4:23.30
  • Other: 1997 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 200 IM, 3x Champion 400 IM

Kristine Quance

University of Southern California – Northridge, CA
Quance, a nine-time individual NCAA champion, five-time conference champion and 23-time All-American, was the recipient of two Honda Sport Awards and a pair of CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year honors. She tallied nine USC records, contributed to an NCAA relay title for the Trojans and captained the Trojan’s 1997 NCAA title-winning women’s team.

  • National Titles: 1994: 200 Breast 2:10.69, 200 IM 1:58.89, 400 IM 4:08.71 / 1996: 200 Breast 2:09.57, 200 IM 1:57.58, 400 IM 4:06.60 / 1997: 200 Breast 2:09.62, 400 IM 4:06.54
  • Other: 1994 & 1996 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 200 Breast, 3x Champion 400 IM

Eileen Richetelli

Stanford University – Milford, CT
Richetelli was the CSCAA Diver-of-the-Year in 1992 and 1993, leading the Cardinal to back-to-back titles. She won three NCAA titles on the platform and two on the 3-meter springboard. Internationally, Richetelli won gold at the 1991 Pan American and 1995 World University Games.

  • National Titles: 1992: 3 Meter 536.3, Platform 582.9 / 1993: 3 Meter 528.75, Platform 530.95 / 1995: Platform 630.1
  • Other: 1992 & 1993 Diver of the Year / 3x Champion Platform

Flavia Rigamonti

Southern Methodist University – Sorengo, Switzerland
When she arrived on the college swimming scene Rigamonti set new standards for distance swimming. The three-time Olympian captured NCAA titles in the 500 and 1650 freestyle as a freshman and sophomore before redshirting in anticipation of the 2004 Olympic Games. After returning from injury and Olympic training, she defended her NCAA title in the 1650 free.

  • National Titles: 2002: 500 Free 4:40.13, 1650 Free 15:52.28 / 2003: 500 Free 4:37.72, 1650 Free 15:43.90 / 2005: 1650 Free 15:46.84
  • Other: 3x Champion 1650 Free

Summer Sanders

Stanford University – Roseville, CA
Named CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year in each of her two seasons, Sanders won six individual NCAA titles while helping the Cardinal to the 1992 team title. She was the 1992 recipient of the Honda Sports Award for Swimming and Diving following her second sweep of the 200 fly, 200 individual medley and 400 individual medley. A four-time Olympic medal winner, Sanders was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 2002.

  • National Titles: 1991: 200 Fly 1:54.17, 200 IM 1:57.02, 400 IM 4:05.19 / 1992: 200 Fly 1:53.42, 200 IM 1:55.54, 400 IM 4:02.28
  • Other: 1991 & 1992 Swimmer of the Year

Brittany Sasser

Amherst College – Belmont, MA
An Anthropology major, Brittany Sasser ’08 established herself as one of the most dominant backstrokers in Division III history by winning both the 100 and 200 for four straight years and setting NCAA records in each event every single year.

  • National Titles: 2005: 100 Back 56.03, 200 Back 2:01.96 / 2006: 100 Back 55.2, 200 Back 1:59.87 / 2007: 100 Back 54.72, 200 Back 1:59.15 / 2008: 100 Back 53.85, 200 Back 1:56.33
  • Other: 2007 & 2008 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Back, 4x Champion 200 Back

Allison Schmitt

University of Georgia – Canton, MI
Schmitt earned 21 All-America citations and eleven NCAA titles (six individual, five relays). The 2013 Honda Sports Award-winner, Schmitt captured three straight titles in the 200 and 500 freestyles. Internationally, she captured ten podium finishes over four Olympics and in 2015 was named USA Swimming’s Perseverance Award.

  • National Titles: 2009: 500 Free 4:35.17 / 2010: 200 Free 1:42.84, 500 Free 4:34.13 / 2011: 200 Free 1:42.08, 500 Free 4:34.20 / 2013: 200 Free 1:41.85
  • Other: 3x Champion 200 Free

Courtney Shealy

University of Georgia – Columbia, SC
The 2000 CSCAA and SEC Swimmer-of-the-Year, Shealy, finished with three individual NCAA titles and relay efforts helped propel Georgia to its first two NCAA team titles. That relay success translated into two Olympic golds. In addition to her prowess in the pool, Shealy was a three-year letter winner for the Bulldog volleyball team where she earned team MVP honors in 1988.

  • National Titles: 2000: 50m Free 24.8, 100m Free 53.99, 100m Back 58.66 /
  • Other: 2000 Swimmer of the Year

Kirsten Silvester

Northern Michigan University – Odjik, The Netherlands
In Silvester’s two years at Northern Michigan, she captured eight individual NCAA titles winning the 200 butterfly and sweeping the 200, 500 and 1650 freestyle two times each. Named CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year in 2000 and 2002, she still holds four school records at the University.

  • National Titles: 1990: 200 Free 1:50.95, 500 Free 4:54.27, 1650 Free 16:51.96, 200 Fly 2:04.37 / 1991: 200 Free 1:49.14, 500 Free 4:50.06, 1650 Free 16:40.19, 200 Fly 2:03.32
  • Other: 1990 & 1991 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year

Julia Smit

Stanford University – Long Island, NY
Named 2010 CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year, Smit captured three consecutive NCAA titles in the individual medley to go along with a pair of wins in the 200 individual medley and ten Pac-10 championships. The two-time Olympic medalist and former world record-holder was named 2010 Honda Sports Award winner for swimming and won a total of nine medals in major international competition.

  • National Titles: 2008: 400 IM 4:02.41 / 2009: 200 IM 1:52.79, 400 IM 4:00.56 / 2010: 200 IM 1:53.56, 400 IM 4:00.90
  • Other: 2010 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 400 IM

Leah Smith

University of Virginia – Pittsburgh, PA
Smith won four NCAA titles as a Cavalier capturing back-to-back titles in the 500 and 1650 freestyle. She captured nine individual ACC titles over her career and collected a total of thirteen first-team All-America honors. Smith is a three-time World Champion, 2016 Olympic medalist and set the American Record in the short course 800-meter freestyle.

  • National Titles: 2015: 500 Free 4:31.54, 1650 Free 15:34.46 / 2016: 500 Free 4:31.33, 1650 Free 15:32.72

Olivia Smoliga

University of Georgia – Glenview, IL
Throughout her career, Smoliga amassed 27 All-America citations and three individual NCAA titles. She claimed seven individual SEC titles and was named 2017 SEC Female Swimmer-of-the-Year. A year later she won a historic eight gold medals at the World Championships before making her second Olympic team in 2021.

  • National Titles: 2014: 50 Free 21.59 / 2016: 50 Free 21.21, 100 Free 46.7

Rebecca Soni

University of Southern California – Freehold, NJ
Soni dominated the breaststroke events, winning four consecutive 200 breast NCAA titles and two additional 100 breast titles en route to five NCAA records and eleven All-America honors. Soni was named Swimming World’s 2009 Swimmer-of-the-Americas and after tallying eight Pac-10 titles (six individual, two relay) and two Pac-10 Tom Hansen Conference Medals was selected to the Pac-12 All-Century Team.

  • National Titles: 2006: 200 Breast 2:09.37 / 2007: 200 Breast 2:08.23 / 2008: 100 Breast 59.19, 200 Breast 2:06.32 / 2009: 100 Breast 58.36, 200 Breast 2:05.52
  • Other: 4x Champion 200 Breast

Gemma Spofforth

University of Florida – West Sussex, Great Britain
During her four seasons at Florida, Spofforth won seven NCAA national championships, including three titles in the 100 and 200 backstrokes. Her efforts culminated in the Gators’ winning the 2010 NCAA team championship. A two-time Olympian, Spofforth established a world record in the 100-meter backstroke at the 2009 World Championships.

  • National Titles: 2007: 200 Back 1:52.96 / 2008: 100 Back 51.78, 200 Back 1:50.70 / 2009: 100 Back 50.55, 200 Back 1:49.11 / 2010: 100 Back 50.92
  • Other: 3x 100 Back Champion, 3x Champion 200 Back

Jill Sterkel

University of Texas – Hacienda Heights, CA
Sterkel’s sixteen individual national championships are the most of any swimmer, male or female, in the history of college swimming. She earned twenty-seven All-America honors and two Honda Swimmer-of-the-Year awards. Sterkel was a four-time Olympian, earning two gold medals and two bronze medals in freestyle and relays and went on to become the Longhorn’s women’s head coach from 1992-2006.

  • National Titles: 1980: 50 Free 22.83, 100 Free 48.76, 50 Fly 24.26, 100 Fly 53.24 / 1981: 50 Free 22.41, 100 Free 48.91, 200 Free 1:48.18, 50 Fly 24.22, 100 Fly 53.1 / 1982: 50 Free 22.59, 100 Free 48.61, 200 Free 1:46.47, 50 Fly 24.03, 100 Fly 53.49 / 1983: 50 Fly 24.26, 100 Fly 53.54
  • Other: 1980, 1981 & 1982 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 50 Fly, 4x Champion 100 Fly, 3x Champion 50 Free, 3x Champion 100 Free

Kendra Stern

Amherst College – Albuquerque, NM
A History of Art and Spanish double major, Kendra Stern won ten individual NCAA freestyle events and swam on three winning relays. Graduating in 2011, Kendra continues to hold the Division III marks in the 100, 200, and 500 freestyle events.

  • National Titles: 2008: 100 Free 49.78, 200 Free 1:47.19, 500 Free 4:52.34 / 2009: 100 Free 49.37, 200 Free 1:47.67 / 2010: 100 Free 48.98, 200 Free 1:45.31 / 2011: 100 Free 49.5, 200 Free 1:44.82, 500 Free 4:43.37
  • Other: 2011 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Free, 4x Champion 200 Free

Cristina Teuscher

Columbia University – Bronx, NY
Columbia’s most-decorated athlete, Teuscher won twelve Ivy League titles, set 17 team records, and captured four NCAA titles. She received the 1998 Honda Sports Award for Swimming and Diving and was a two-time Olympian, capturing gold in the 800-meter freestyle relay in 1996 and the bronze in the 200-meter individual medley in 2000.

  • National Titles: 1998: 500 Free 4:35.45, 400 IM 4:05.62 / 2000: 400m Free 4:04.09, 400m IM 4:33.81

Jenny Thompson

Stanford University – Danvers, MA
One of the most decorated women’s swimmers in history, Thompson ended her career having collected the 1995 Honda Sports Award, nine individual, ten relay and four NCAA team titles. Thompson represented Team USA in four Olympic Games where she captured twelve medals (eight gold) and she set fifteen world records over her career.

  • National Titles: 1992: 50 Free 22.14, 100 Free 47.61 / 1993: 50 Free 22.16, 100 Free 48.03 / 1994: 100 Free 47.74, 100 Fly 51.81 / 1995: 100 Free 48.38, 100 Fly 52.77, 200 IM 1:57.63
  • Other: 4x Champion 100 Free

Janet Thorburn

Southern Methodist University – Albuquerque, NM
Thorburn won the 1979 AIAW Championship on both the 1- and 3-meter springboards. In 1972 she became the first woman from SU to represent Team USA at the Olympic Games, taking fourth in both the springboard and platform events. She took gold in the 10m platform at the 1975 World Championships and competed in the 1976 Olympics in Montreal in platform.

  • National Titles: 1979: 1 Meter, 3 Meter / /
  • Other: 1979 Diver of the Year

Christine Tixier

Biola University – Benton City, WA
Tixier is the two-time NAIA Female Swimmer-of-the-Year who racked up 13 NAIA All-American honors, eight NAIA championships, and set three NAIA records. Tixler captured the 100 butterfly in each of her four seasons at Biola and was named CoSIDA Academic All-American-of-the-Year during her senior year.

  • National Titles: 2012: 100 Fly 54.6 / 2013: 100 Fly 54.75 / 2014: 100 Fly 54.35, 200 Fly 2:01.53, 200 IM 2:04.48 / 2015: 100 Fly 54.34, 200 Fly 2:00.89, 200 IM 2:02.75
  • Other: 2014 & 2015 NAIA Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Fly

Logan Todhunter

Williams College – Ithaca, NY
Todhunter, like teammate Caroline Wilson, was a multi-event threat, capturing individual NCAA Division III titles in eleven of 12 opportunities. Along the way she established five new Division III records and was unbeaten in the 100 and 200 butterfly against Division III competition. She was named CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year in both 2010 and 2012.

  • National Titles: 2009: 100 Fly 53.54, 200 Fly 1:57.80 / 2010: 100 Fly 53.56, 200 Fly 1:57.46, 200 IM 2:02.57 / 2011: 100 Fly 53.57, 200 Fly 1:57.61, 200 IM 2:01.71 / 2012: 100 Fly 53.04, 200 Fly 1:55.66, 200 IM 2:00.58
  • Other: 2010 & 2012 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Fly, 4x Champion 200 Fly, 3x Champion 200 IM

Dara Torres

University of Florida – Beverly Hills, CA
Torres was a mainstay of Gator relays in the late 1980s. She captured three NCAA titles, was a member of six NCAA Championship relays, and collected 28 All-American certificates. Won nine individual and 12 SEC relay titles and named SEC Athlete-of-the-Year in 1988, SEC Swimmer-of-the-Year in 1987 and 1989, and also played volleyball for the Gators.

  • National Titles: 1988: 50 Free 22.38, 100 Free 48.26, 100 Fly 52.95 /

Kathy Treible

University of Florida – Brookfield, WI
Treible captured three of her six individual national championships in the inaugural NCAA Championship. Those three wins, following a sweep of the 50, 100, and 200 breaststroke at the 1981 AIAW Championships, helped the Gators capture the first-ever NCAA women’s swimming championship. Treible won twelve SEC titles and was recognized as the SEC Female Swimmer-of-the-Year in 1981 and 1982.

  • National Titles: 1981: 100 Breast 1:02.57, 200 Breast 2:16.19, 50 Breast 29.14 / 1982: 100 Breast 1:02.44, 200 Breast 2:14.20, 50 Breast 28.89

Diana Ureche

Simon Fraser University – Romania
Between 1995 and 1998 Ureche was unstoppable, winning twelve individual and ten relay titles at the NAIA Championship. A four-year champion in the 100 backstroke, she also displayed versatility winning five different events in her career. She represented Romania at the 1972 Olympics and is the only athlete to be named CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year four times.

  • National Titles: 1995: 100 Back 57.31, 100 Fly 55.33, 200 IM 2:05.94 / 1996: 100 Back 56.84, 100 Fly 57.05, 200 Fly 2:06.61 / 1997: 100 Back 56.27, 200 Back 2:02.63, 200 IM 2:07.91 / 1998: 50 Free 23.67, 100 Back 56.38, 200 Back 2:03.50
  • Other: 1995-1998 NAIA Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Back

Dana Vollmer

University of California – Granbury, TX
As a senior, Vollmer was named CSCAA and Pac-10 Swimmer-of-the-Year as she led Cal to the NCAA team championship. She won seven NCAA races, including individual wins in the 100 butterfly, 100 freestyle, and 200 freestyle. Vollmer swam on three Olympic teams, where she won seven of her 35 international medals.

  • National Titles: 2007: 100 Fly 50.69 / 2009: 100 Free 47.17, 200 Free 1:42.01
  • Other: 2009 Swimmer of the Year

Sue Walsh

University of North Carolina – Hamburg, NY
In the early 1980s Walsh was virtually unbeatable in the backstroke. The three-time ACC Swimmer-of-the-Year, she won ten individual titles including a four-year run in the 100 backstroke. Walsh was selected to be a member of the 1980 U.S. Olympic team and was the 1983 Pan-American champion in the 100-meter backstroke.

  • National Titles: 1981: 50 Back 25.97, 100 Back 55.6 / 1982: 50 Back 25.64, 100 Back 54.81, 200 Back 1:59.47 / 1983: 50 Back 25.85, 100 Back 55.62, 200 Back 1:59.05 / 1984: 100 Back 55.32, 200 Back 1:59.84
  • Other: 3x Champion 50 Back, 4x Champion 100 Back, 3x Champion 200 Back

Laura Wilkinson

University of Texas – Spring, TX
Wilkinson was a two-time NCAA Champion in platform for the Longhorns, winning during her freshman and junior campaigns, and a six-time All-American during her three-year collegiate career. Wilkinson won gold at the 2000 Sydney Olympics and added a gold medal at the 2005 FINA World Championships, becoming the only woman to win platform titles at each of the major world championships.

  • National Titles: 1997: Platform 606.1 / 1999: Platform 664.75

Caroline Wilson

Williams College – Cranford, NJ
Wilson, like teammate Logan Todhunter, was a multi-event threat, capturing individual NCAA Division III titles in eleven of twelve opportunities. The 2013 CSCAA Division III Swimmer-of-the-Year captured the 400 individual medley each of her four years and could have matched the feat in the 1650 freestyle but instead opted to compete in (and win) back-to-back events in the 200 individual medley and 500 freestyle.

  • National Titles: 2010: 500 Free 4:45.47, 1650 Free 16:25.21, 400 IM 4:17.85 / 2011: 1650 Free 16:31.46, 400 IM 4:13.90 / 2012: 500 Free 4:45.45, 1650 Free 16:40.42, 400 IM 4:13.14 / 2013: 500 Free 4:47.16, 200 IM 1:59.43, 400 IM 4:14.27
  • Other: 2013 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 1650 Free, 4x Champion 400 IM

Jamie Wolf

Clarion University of Pennsylvania – Pittsburgh, PA
Wolf is the most accomplished women’s diver in NCAA Division II history. A record seven-time NCAA Division II champion. Wolf was a three-time CSCAA Diver-of-the-Year, an NCAA Woman-of-the-Year finalist, and a recipient of the 2008 NCAA Top VIII Award.

  • National Titles: 2004: 1 Meter 382, 3 Meter 421.7 / 2006: 3 Meter 814.85 / 2007: 1 Meter 733.75, 3 Meter 819.15
  • Other: 2004, 2005 & 2007 Division 2 Diver of the Year / 3x Champion 3 Meter

Kelsi Worrell

University of Louisville – Westampton, NJ
Worrell swept NCAA titles in both the 100 and 200 butterfly as a Junior and Senior and became the first woman to swim the 100 butterfly in under 50 seconds. She totaled nine individual All-America honors and set records in three separate conferences – the Big East, the American and and the ACC. A two-time Olympian, Worrell won the Honda Award for swimming & diving in 2016.

  • National Titles: 2015: 100 Fly 49.81, 200 Fly 1:51.11 / 2016: 100 Fly 49.43, 200 Fly 1:50.96

Georgia Wright

West Chester University – Doncaster, Great Britain
Georgia Wright was the most-dominant distance swimmer in the history of the PSAC and the most-decorated in Division II over her career. She was an eight-time NCAA champion, a 14-time All-America and four-time champion in the 1000 freestyle. Wright holds four PSAC records (500 free, 1000 free, 1650 free, and 200 back), and is the current Division II record holder in the 1000 free (9:43.70).

  • National Titles: 2017: 1000 Free 9:48.87, 1650 Free 16:22.92 / 2018: 1000 Free 9:51.16, 1650 Free 16:25.78 / 2019: 500 Free 4:48.33, 1000 Free 9:45.86, 1650 Free 16:20.05 / 2020: 1000 Free 9:43.70
  • Other: 4x Champion 1000 Free, 3x Champion 1650 Free

Ann Wycoff

United States Military Academy – Stony Brook, NY
Army’s most honored athlete at the national level, Wycoff graduated as the winningest female swimmer in NCAA Division II history. She earned CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year honors in both 1988 and 1989, winning four individual national titles both years. In all, Wycoff captured All-America recognition on 19 different occasions and helped Army to a fourth-place finish at the NCAA Championships.

  • National Titles: 1987: 400 IM 4:30.64 / 1988: 1650 Free 16:58.74, 200 Fly 2:04.04, 200 IM 2:06.96, 400 IM 4:25.45 / 1989: 1650 Free 17:01.17, 200 Fly 2:03.26, 200 IM 2:05.98, 400 IM 4:24.76
  • Other: 1988 & 1989 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 400 IM

Nida Zuhal

Drury University – Veenendaal, The Netherlands
A three-time CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year, Zuhal captured seven national titles highlighted by a four-year sweep of the 200 butterfly. Zuhal competed in the 1996 Olympic Games, a year before leading the Panthers to their first-ever NCAA Division II title. An Academic All-American, she was also a nominee for the NCAA Women-of-the-Year Award in 1997 and the NCAA Today’s Top VIII Award.

  • National Titles: 1994: 500 Free 5:00.18, 100 Fly 57.07, 200 Fly 2:03.24 / 1995: 200 Fly 2:05.41 / 1996: 100 Fly 56.54, 200 Fly 2:02.27, 200 IM 2:05.82 / 1997: 100 Fly 56.53, 200 Fly 2:01.77, 200 IM 2:05.14
  • Other: 1996 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 100 Fly, 4x Champion 200 Fly

— The above press release was posted by Swimming World in conjunction with the CSCAA. For press releases and advertising inquiries please contact Advertising@SwimmingWorld.com.

6 Comments
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Leander
7 months ago

The Mary T one was really easy to spot because it described the accomplishments of a Canadian man. They’ve since fixed it, and my original comment seems to have gone down the memory joke.

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David Abineri
7 months ago

Shane Gould is not one of the top 100??

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Admin
Reply to  David Abineri

Shane did not swim collegiately in the United States.

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Admin

The piece is being further edited. If you feel info should be corrected, please notify the CSCAA, as that organization conducted the research for the list.

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AA
7 months ago

I believe Elizabeth Beisel should receive consideration.

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Dennis McKenna
7 months ago

For college swimming Elizabeth Pelton could be on the list. Two NCAA records, NCAA swimming of the meet, and a 12 individual NCAA finalist