2018 FINA World Cup Kazan Day 1 Recap: Hosszu Wins Twice, Andrew Wins

Katinka Hosszu. Photo Courtesy: SIPA USA

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The FINA Swimming World Cup kicked off for the season with the first day of three in Kazan, Russia.

Meet records were set and some of the biggest names in swimming had record performances.

DAY 1 RESULTS

Women’s 400 Free

Hungary’s Katinka Hosszu got the meet off to a fast start by winning the 400 IM in 4:12.09. She crushed the field by more than two seconds.

Compatriot Zsuzsanna Jakabos was second in 4:14.70, followed by China’s Zhou Chanzhen (4:16.11).

Men’s 400 Free

Russia’s Iaroslav Potapov cruised to victory in the men’s 400 free, clocking a time of 3:54.78. He held off China’s Wu Yuhang, who finished in 3:55.13.

Hungary’s Daniel Dudas took third in 3:55.38.

Women’s 50 Back

Kira Toussaint of the Netherlands surged to victory in the women’s 50 back, finishing in 28.18. She held off Katinka Hosszu, who had just won the 400 IM two events prior. Hosszu finished in 28.37 to take second.

Russia’s Mariia Kameneva was third in 28.38.

Men’s 200 Back

Mitch Larkin of Australia absolutely dominated the men’s 200 back, winning in 1:57.23. Though it was nearly four seconds off the World Cup record, it was three seconds faster than the rest of the field.

Dmitrii Maltcev was second in 2:00.78, followed by Maxim Tretyakov, who finished in 2:02.47.

Women’s 200 Fly

Katinka Hosszu made it three events in a row as she dove in for the 200 fly. She won her second of the three but clocking a 2:08.93.

She again finished ahead of compatriot Zsuzsanna Jakabos (2:09.13).

Lada Bragina was third in 2:18.88.

Men’s 100 Fly

Michael Andrew of the U.S. was first at the 50 and hung on to win the men’s 100 fly in a four-way battle that came down to the touch.

Andrew finished in 51.96, just four hundredths of a second ahead of South Africa’s Chad le Clos (52.00) and Russia’s Egor Kuimov (52.00), who tied for second.

South Africa’s Ryan Coetzee, who had the top seed in prelims, finished fourth in 52.10.

Women’s 200 Breast

Russia went 1-2 in the women’s 200 breast as Vitalina Simonov and Daria Chikunova claimed the top two spots by a wide margin.

Simonova won the event in 2:23.86, while Chikunova was second in 2:25.29.

Lithuania’s Agne Seleikaite was third in 2:34.34.

Men’s 100 Breast

Russia’s Anton Chupkov was third at the turn but powered back to win the men’s 100 breast in 59.53, winning by two tenths.

Brazil’s Felipe Lima finished second in 59.73, followed by Arno Kamminga of the Netherlands, who clocked a 59.99.

Women’s 50 Free

Sweden’s Sarah Sjostrom continued her dominating sprinting by setting a World Cup record in the women’s 50 free.

Sjostrom finished in 23.83, breaking the World Cup record set by Cate Campbell (24.30) in 2015.

Spots 2-3 went to the Netherlands as Ranomi Kromowidjojo finished second in 24.55, followed by Femke Heemskerk (24.64).

Russia’s Mariia Kameneva was fourth (24.68), followed by Kim Busch of the Netherlands (24.96), Switzerland’s Alexandra Touretski (25.21), Hungary’s Katinka Hosszu (25.28), competing in her fourth race of the day, and Arina Surkova (25.39).

Men’s 50 Free

Russia’s Vladimir Morozov watched as Sarah Sjostrom set the World Cup record in the women’s 50 free and duplicated the feat, setting the World Cup record in the men’s event to close out the first finals session of the event.

Morozov finished in 21.49 to break the record set by France’s Florent Manaudou in 2015.

Michael Andrew of the U.S. finished second in 21.99, followed by Andrii Govorov of the Ukraine in 22.03.

Blake Pieroni of the U.S. was just off the podium, finishing fourth in 22.29, followed by Jesse Puts of the Netherlands (22.32), Belgium’s Pieter Timmers (22.48), South Africa’s Ryan Coetzee (22.66) and Russia’s Daniil Markov (23.11).

2 Comments

2 comments

  1. avatar
    Yup

    Michael Andrew went out hard and got caught? You don’t say…..

Author: Daniel D'Addona

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Dan D'Addona is the lead college swim writer for Swimming World. He has covered swimming at all levels since 2003, including the NCAA championships, USA nationals, Duel in the Pool and Olympic trials. He is a native of Ann Arbor, Michigan, and a graduate of Central Michigan University. He currently lives in Holland, Michigan, where he also is the Sports Editor at The Holland Sentinel.

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