Matt Kredich
Courtesy of: University of Tennessee
VIRGINIA BEACH, Virginia, April 23. THE CSCAA Executive Board of Directors takes great pleasure in announcing the 2013 recipients of our five major awards. The awards will be presented at the CSCAA Annual Banquet on Thursday, May 16, 2013 held in conjunction with the CSCAA Convention at the Disney Coronado Springs Resort.

The Collegiate and Scholastic Trophy: Matt Kredich, The University of Tennessee

The Benjamin Franklin Award: Whit Babcock, The University of Cincinnati


The Speedo Lifetime Achievement Award: Skip Kenney, Stanford University, retired

The Steadman Award: Nancy Bigelow, Tufts University

The Charles McCaffree Award: Dr. Steven Scott and Captain Ray O'Donnell

Full biographies are listed after all award winners.

The National Collegiate and Scholastic Swimming Trophy

The National Collegiate and Scholastic Swimming Trophy, is the highest award of its kind in the United States. It is presented to an individual or organization for having contributed in an outstanding way to swimming as a competitive sport and as a healthful recreational activity at schools and colleges. The 2013 Recipient of the Collegiate Trophy is Matt Kredich, the head coach of the women's and men's swimming teams at the University of Tennessee. Coach Kredich led the Volunteer Men to a 16th place finish while the Lady Vols captured 3rd place at their respective 2013 NCAA Championships in their first year as a combined program. The Lady Vols not only started off the NCAA Championship with the first relay victory in program history by winning the 400 Medley Relay, they continued on to win the next two relay events of the meet, 200 Freestyle Relay and the 200 Medley Relay.

Said Kredich on the award "I'm very grateful for the recognition that this award brings to the job that our entire coaching staff did this year. Because I have tremendous respect for the high level of coaching that goes on across all NCAA divisions in a variety of circumstances, it is really very humbling to have our program honored in this way. I'm very appreciative of the recognition and I'm committed to live up to the standard that this award represents."

After seven successful seasons of directing the Lady Vols, 2012-13 was Matt Kreich's first season of coaching the newly combined Tennessee men's and women's swimming and diving program.

During Kredich's tenure at Tennessee, the Lady Vols have broken all 19 Tennessee swimming and diving records, including new marks in all five relays. The team has produced 32 All-Americans who have achieved a comprehensive total of 179 All-American certificates. The team also finished in the top 15 at the NCAA Championships for a school-record seven consecutive seasons, encompassing the entirety of Kredich's leadership of the UT women's program including this year's 3rd place finish, the highest in program history.

Benjamin Franklin Award

Awarded to the individual, or organization, whose efforts best promote the integrity and enhancement of the student‐athlete ideal. The inaugural winner of this award in 2008 was Dr. Myles Brand. The 2013 recipient of the Benjamin Franklin Award is Whit Babcock, Director of Athletics at the University of Cincinnati. Mr. Babcock recently announced a commitment to reinstate and enhance Olympic Sport scholarships and funding at the University of Cincinnati, including the restoration of scholarships to the men's and women's Bearcat Swimming Teams.

"I'm truly honored by this recognition from the College Swimming Coaches Association of America," stated Babcock. "The scholarship enhancements for our Olympic sport programs at UC, including swimming and diving, are a necessary step as we aim to compete at a championship level and achieve comprehensive excellence for our entire department."

Mr. Babcock was quick to point out that this was an effort by many people at UC who played a key role in this decision and initiative including UC President Dr. Santa Ono and UC Football Coach Tommy Tuberville who pledged $300,000 towards the effort.

In the midst of his second year on campus, Whit Babcock's tenure began with the Bearcats' leader initiating a new administrative structure within the department, a comprehensive vision for athletic facility enhancement, a three-year strategic plan for all facets of the program, and numerous external relations strategies to connect and engage with Bearcats' alumni, donors, fans, and students. At the end of his first year at UC the competitive successes by Bearcat teams led to UC's highest finish in the Learfield Sports Directors' Cup standings, a system that ranks athletic departments across all sports nationally.

Speedo CSCAA Lifetime Achievement Award

Awarded to the individual whose efforts best exemplify the integrity and ideals of collegiate swimming and who has achieved significant success in the sport while still imparting the educational and character building qualities of the collegiate swimming experience. The 2013 recipient of the CSCAA Speedo Lifetime Achievement Award is Skip Kenney of Stanford University.

Before retiring in 2012, Coach Kenney Skip Kenney served as a three time US Olympic Coach, was recognized as the CSCAA NCAA Division I Coach of the Year six times and was honored as the Pac-10 Coach of the Year 20 times. In 33 years at Stanford he led the Cardinal to 7 NCAA Men's Championships and 31 straight conference titles.

Skip Kenney has developed some of the top swimmers in the world. Through his three decades at Stanford he proved to be one of the most successful coaches in the history of collegiate athletics. In 2004, he was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame, and a year later he was elected into the American Swim Coaches Hall of Fame.

The Richard E. Steadman Award

The Richard E. Steadman award is conferred annually to a swimming or diving coach in high school, club, or university ranks who, in the opinion of the CSCAA, has done the most to spread happiness in Coach Steadman's beloved sport of swimming and diving. The 2013 Recipient of the Richard E. Steadman Award is Nancy Bigelow of Tufts University.

"I am thrilled beyond words to be the recipient of this very special award and humbled to be listed with some the greatest coaches in our sport. Thank you!" Said Bigelow upon learning of the honor.

Nancy Bigelow recently completed her 37th season as a college swimming coach, including the past 31 seasons at Tufts University.

Twice in the past five years (2009 and 2012), Bigelow was selected as the New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) Coach of the Year. The 2012-13 team's victory over Wheaton College at home on January 26 was the 200th of Coach Bigelow's tenure at Tufts. Her teams have posted a 200-80-2 record for dual meets during her 30 seasons at Tufts, an outstanding .713 winning percentage.

Coach Bigelow was also presented the Massachusetts State Lottery and Boston College Athletics "Heights Award" in January 2008. The award recognizes the Massachusetts residents who have made significant contributions to women's athletics.

Charles McCaffree Award

The Charles McCaffree Award is presented annually to an individual connected to the sport of swimming who has achieved outstanding success in a field other than Aquatics. The 2013 Charles McCaffree award is presented jointly to Dr. Steven Scott and Captain Ray O'Donnell.

Captain Ray O'Donnell was captain of the 2001 University of Hawaii Swimming Team and a letter winner from 1998-2001. During his time at Hawaii he was also a member of the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) and went into active duty following graduation.

The recipient of a Bronze Star Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, Capt. O'Donnell was injured during a routine combat patrol in August 2007 in Afghanistan. A roadside bomb threw Capt. O'Donnell approximately 80 feet from his vehicle.

Dr. Steven Scott from the James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital in Tampa, Florida is the Medical Director of the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center; Chief of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Assistant Professor, University of South Florida College of Medicine; Program Director of the Rehab Medicine and Spinal Cord Injury Residency Programs; Principle Investigator of the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Program. Dr. Scott was the recipient of the Olin E. Teague Award which is the highest award for treating War-Related Injuries in the VA in 2004, received the Commander Award as VA Employee of the Year from the Disable Veterans of American in 2007. Dr. Scott has made numerous presentations on the Polytrauma System of Care throughout the Nation as well as appearances on National Television and Newspapers and has testified before congress on care for military veterans.

Dr. Scott is a 1972 graduate of Springfield College where he was a member of the swimming team and achieved CSCAA All-American Status. He is listed among the school's distinguished alumni and returns to speak at the college.

Dr. Scott was a part of the team of physicians involved with Captain O'Donnell's recovery and rehabilitation. Captain Ray O'Donnell, who, with a most appreciative spirit, overcame all odds to again lead troops in battle after numerous obstacles and surgeries. It is with great pride that the CSCAA honors these two former collegiate swimmers whose life paths crossed in a critical and amazing manner.

Full Award Winner Bios

Matt Kredich


After seven successful seasons of directing the Lady Vols, Matt Kredich 2012-13 was his first season of the newly combined Tennessee men's and women's swimming and diving program.

During Kredich's tenure at Tennessee, the Lady Vols have broken all 19 Tennessee swimming and diving records, including new marks in all five relays. The team has produced 32 All-Americans who have achieved a comprehensive total of 179 All-American certificates. The team has also finished in the top 15 at the NCAA Championships for a school-record seven consecutive seasons, encompassing the entirety of Kredich's leadership of the UT women's program including this year's 3rd place finish, the highest in program history.

Among the numerous success stories include 100-meter butterfly American record holder Christine Magnuson, who was a double silver medalist at the 2008 Olympic Games and finished her college career as a 23-time All-American, four-time SEC champion and Swimmer of the Year, NCAA champion, and Olympic Trials champion.

Kredich accepted the head coaching position of the Tennessee women's swimming and diving program on April 30, 2005. He joined UT after spending four seasons at Richmond from 2001-02 through 2004-05, when he led the Spiders to the NCAA Championships for the first time in the program's history and won the Colonial Athletic Association championship in all four years. He previously served as the head coach of a combined program at Brown University for nine seasons (1993-2001) where he won four conference titles.

Whit Babcock

Whit Babcock completed his first year as director of athletics for the University of Cincinnati's intercollegiate programs in the fall, marking a busy beginning that saw the Bearcats' leader initiate a new administrative structure within the department, a comprehensive vision for athletic facility enhancement, a three-year strategic plan for all facets of the program, and numerous external relations strategies to connect and engage with Bearcats' alumni, donors, fans, and students.

"I'm thrilled to be here and to serve UC and the Bearcat Family in this capacity," Babcock said. "When I arrived last fall, the season was already halfway over and winter sports were just beginning practice. I'm looking forward to my first full athletic and academic year and helping to build upon our positive momentum."

Year one was certainly full of notable highlights, both on the field and in the classroom. The football team won the BIG EAST Conference title and defeated Vanderbilt University in the Liberty Bowl. The men's basketball team reached the title game of the BIG EAST Tournament and advanced to the NCAA Sweet 16. UC was one of just six schools in the nation to have both its football and men's basketball programs be nationally ranked at the end of the year. Women's basketball earned a berth in the Women's National Invitational Tournament (WNIT) and posted a first-round win. Volleyball won the BIG EAST Tournament Championship and participated in the NCAA Tournament. Women's track had its best-ever finishes in the BIG EAST Championship meet in both indoor and outdoor competition. Those competitive successes led to UC's highest finish in the Learfield Sports Directors' Cup standings, a system that ranks athletic departments across all sports nationally.

The academic accomplishments were just as glowing. UC student-athletes as a whole posted a cumulative grade point average of 3.079 during the spring quarter. Over 200 student-athletes eclipsed the academic standards to earn nomination for BIG EAST all-academic awards. Men's track and field/cross country student-athlete Eric Finan was selected as the BIG EAST's scholar-athlete of the year and J.K. Shaffer was the conference's scholar-athlete of the year for football. UC student-athletes also topped 5,000 volunteer and service hours in the community, lending support to three dozen local organizations. 2012-13 will mark the inaugural year of the newly implemented BEARCATstrong program which recognizes student-athletes who excel in academic performance, strength and conditioning, personal character and service to others.

Babcock was officially announced as UC's 14th AD on Oct. 22, 2011, following five years at the University of Missouri, where he served as the executive associate director of athletics. His background in fundraising, marketing, promotions, ticket sales, licensing and multimedia partnerships were key attributes in support of his hiring. In his introductory press conference, Babcock cited three guiding principles for his vision for the athletic department's future: commitment to comprehensive excellence, centering the department's focus on the student-athlete experience, and engaging the community.

Since becoming UC AD, Babcock has been active on the local and national speaking circuits. He recently presented before the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) and the 1-A Athletic Directors Association annual institute. He is the immediate past president of the National Association of Athletic Development Directors (NAADD). Babcock also serves on the NCAA men's basketball issues committee and in several leadership roles within the BIG EAST.

Prior to his time at Missouri, Babcock's 19-year career path included stops at West Virginia University, Auburn University, and James Madison University.

A native of Harrisonburg, Va., Babcock lettered four seasons in baseball at James Madison University and served as team captain his senior year. He earned his bachelor's degree from JMU in 1992. In 1996, he received his master's in sports management from West Virginia University. He and his wife, Kelly, have three sons: Andrew, Brett and Eli.

Skip Kenney

3-Time Olympic Coach
* 6-Time NCAA Coach of the Year
* 20-Time Pac-10 Coach of the Year

Over 33 years Skip Kenney has developed some of the top swimmers in the world. A testament to his accomplishments is the fact he stands alone amongst his peers in regards to team and individual accomplishments throughout his three decades of service at Stanford. He has coached with multiple Olympic teams and been on the forefront in developing young men both in and out of the water.

The position, now named the Goldman Family Director of Men's Swimming, was endowed in March, 2011, thanks to a gift from John and Marcia Goldman.

In 2004, he was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame, and a year later he was elected into the American Swim Coaches Hall of Fame. Kenney has led the Cardinal to seven NCAA titles, including a runaway win in 1998. He has also been named NCAA Coach of the Year six times (1982, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1992, 1998). In addition, Kenney has led the Cardinal to some of the finest team performances in the history of the NCAA Championship meet. He has also been named Pac-10 Coach of the Year a record 20 times (1983, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009).

The 1992 squad set NCAA meet records for points scored (632) and victory margin (276 points over Texas), and the 1998 team became the first to have a championship final representative in every individual and relay swimming event.

He has also coached a total of 134 All-Americans to 1086 All-American honors, and has developed 72 NCAA Champions.

Even more impressive, in the 33 years as a head coach, the Cardinal finished in the top-three, 26 times, and never lower than fourth since 1982. Kenney turned Stanford into a perennial contender since his arrival. Prior to his arrival, Stanford had won just one national title (1967) and finished third another three times from 1936 to 1980. Of the 61 conference championship teams since 1916-17, half (31) have come since Kenney's arrival--all in a row.

Prior to winning its first conference title in 1982, Stanford had not been atop the conference since 1958-59. Kenney's achievements as head coach at Stanford are unparalleled in Pac-10 history. His 31 consecutive conference titles stands as the record for consecutive Pac-10 championships in any sport.

The Cardinal broke the conference record for consecutive titles, established by UCLA men's basketball under John Wooden, in 1995 when it captured its 14th consecutive title. Another major achievement is that 100 percent of Kenney's student-athletes have earned their degrees. Also, 10 athletes since 1983 have been named CoSIDA Academic All-Americans, a list that includes three-time recipient and Olympian Pablo Morales, and fellow Olympians Ray Carey, Kurt Grote and Ben Wildman-Tobriner.

Kenney is also one of the top coaches on the international circuit. He was named men's coach for the U.S. team at the 2004 Short Course World Championships held in Indianapolis. He also served as head coach of the U.S. men's team at the 1996 Olympics, and was an assistant coach at both the 1984 and 1988 Olympics. He has also served as U.S. national team coach at many other world championships, Pan-American Games and Pan-Pacific Championships.

During his tenure, his list of former athletes is a who's who of the swimming world: Randall Bal (2007 Pan American Games Medalist, 2007 Japan International Swim Meet medalist), Dave Bottom (former American record holder), Ray Carey (1996 U.S. Olympian), Andy Grant (Gold and two-time silver medalist at 2007 Pan American Games) Kurt Grote (1996 Olympic Gold Medalist), Jeff Kostoff (1984 and 1988 U.S. Olympian, former American record holder), Peter Marshall (2007 Pan American Games Medalist, World record holder), John Moffet (1980 and 1984 U.S. Olympian, former world record holder), Pablo Morales (three-time Olympic Gold Medalist and former world record holder), Jay Mortensen (1988 U.S. Olympian), Anthony Mosse (1988 Olympic Bronze Medalist), Sean Murphy (1988 Canadian Olympian), Eddie Parenti (1992 and 1996 Canadian Olympian), Brian Retterer (former American record holder), Markus Rogan (Three-time Austrian Olympian, a world record holder in the 200 backstroke, a two-time Olympic silver medalist in 2004, and a 2007 World University Games Medalist), Jeff Rouse (1992 and 1996 Olympic Gold Medalist, world record holder), John Simons (1980 U.S. Olympian), Dave Sims (1980 U.S. Olympian), Ben Wildman-Tobriner (2008 Olympic Gold Medalist in the 400 free relay, 2007 two-time gold medalist at FINA World Championships, Former American record holder), Derek Weatherford (American record holder), and Tom Wilkens (2000 U.S. Olympian).

In 33 years as the head coach at Stanford, Kenney has posted a 243-40 (.859) overall record, including a 146-10 record (.936) over the past 18 years. Since the 2000-01 season, Stanford has lost just five times in dual meets, going 82-5. The team has finished second or third nationally 11 of the last 12 seasons.

Over a 14-year span from 1984 until 1998, the Cardinal won seven national titles, three-peating from 1985 to 1987 and from 1992 to 1994. Kenney's first national championship team in 1985 featured Olympians Pablo Morales, John Moffet and Jeff Kostoff, winning an unprecedented eight events. Morales, a sophomore at the time, won three of his 11 NCAA titles that year. In 1986, it was a lopsided affair, as the Cardinal beat Cal 404-335, taking home six individual titles. Kenney was named NCAA Coach of the Year for the second straight year, and third time in five seasons. The team's 1987 title was the curtain call for Morales and Kostoff, both seniors, as the Cardinal won five individual titles. The Cardinal dominated the field and routed second place USC by 78 points.

The next three-peat occurred from 1992 to 1994. In 1992, Stanford scored a record 632 points, smoking Texas by 276 points for its fourth title in eight years. At the meet alone, Cardinal swimmers set seven American records as it marked the first time a program had swept all five relays. A repeat was on in 1993, as the Cardinal came to the Championships following its 12th-straight Pac-10 title. The Cardinal came away with three individual titles and three relay titles. In 1994, Stanford racked up 566.5 points to beat Texas, winning five individual titles and three more relays.

The Class of 1994 established itself as the best group of swimmers in the history of the sport. Stanford again ran away from the rest of the field, finishing with 599 points in 1998, the second-most in school-history. The Cardinal had a finalist in each of the 18 finals, winning eight of them. Kenney began his career on The Farm in August 1979, taking three seasons to set the school-record for dual victories (11-2). He then posted the first undefeated season (14-0) in nearly two decades in 1982-83, as he ascended the national ladder. He finished 10th at his first NCAA Championship in 1980, ninth in his second, before finishing third in his third season at the helm.

A 1972 graduate of Long Beach State, Kenney was an assistant for the 49ers from 1968 to 1971, before heading the Harvard program from 1971 to 1972. His career then led to the Dads AAU Club in Houston from 1972 to 1976, before coaching the famous Cincinnati Pepsi Marlins AAU club team for three seasons from 1977 to 1979. The Marlins placed fourth (1977) and fifth (1978) nationally at the AAU Championships during his tenure.

He was twice named Coach of the Year by the Ohio AAU Association. Kenney was inducted into the Fresno Athletic Hall of Fame in 1994-95 in recognition of his accomplishments in the men's swimming arena. Kenney has two children, Kristine and Richard.

Nancy Bigelow

Nancy Bigelow recently completed her 37th season as a college swimming coach, including the past 31 seasons at Tufts University.

Twice in the past five years (2009 and 2012), Bigelow has been selected as the New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) Coach of the Year. In 2009, Coach Bigelow guided the Tufts women's swimming & diving team to its best-ever finish at the conference championship meet at the time as the Jumbos placed third. In 2012, her squad was second at the NESCAC Championships after the first and second days before finishing third.

The 2012-13 team's victory over Wheaton College at home on January 26 was the 200th of Coach Bigelow's tenure at Tufts. Her teams have posted a 200-80-2 record for dual meets during her 30 seasons at Tufts, an outstanding .713 winning percentage.

Coach Bigelow was also presented the Massachusetts State Lottery and Boston College Athletics "Heights Award" in January 2008. The award recognizes Massachusetts residents who have made significant contributions to women's athletics. Bigelow was honored at halftime of a Boston College vs. Wake Forest University women's basketball contest.

Bigelow has worked in women's athletics for more than 35 years as a head coach, official, and board member. During her successful Tufts career, the Jumbos captured three New England team titles and annually qualify swimmers and divers for the NCAA Championship meet. Bigelow, a three-time New England Coach of the Year winner, was named a Master and Distinguished Coach by the College Swimming Coaches Association of America in 2006.

Prior to her arrival at Tufts, Bigelow coached at Wellesley College from 1975-80 where she oversaw the women's volleyball and women's fencing teams. Her overall record as a swimming coach stands at 218-100-2.

She also served as an assistant women's swim coach from 1980-82 at Penn State. She is a 1975 graduate of Penn State.

Bigelow was formerly on the NCAA swimming & diving rules committee, including serving as its chair for the 2010-11 season. She served as President for two four-year terms of the New England Swimming and Diving Association. She and her husband Bob have two boys, David, 26 and Stephen, 21.

Captain Ray O'Donnell

Captain Ray O'Donnell was captain of the 2001 University of Hawaii Swimming Team and was a letter winner from 1998-2001. During his time at Hawaii he was also a member of the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) and went into active duty following graduation.

The recipient of a Bronze Star Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, Capt. O'Donnell was injured during a routine combat patrol in August 2007 in Afghanistan. A roadside bomb threw Capt. O'Donnell approximately 80 feet from his vehicle.

Capt. O'Donnell sustained several severe injuries, including a left hip dislocation that also fractured his pelvis and hip joint, a fracture and dislocation of his right wrist, a bladder rupture, several facial bone fractures, and a collapsed lung. Tragically, two close friends were killed when his vehicle was destroyed.

For his own injuries, Capt. O'Donnell was initially treated in Bagrum, Afghanistan, and, after initial resuscitation, was rapidly transferred to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany. He next flew to Walter Reed Army Medical Center for further stabilization and care and finally to Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio for definitive treatment of his injuries. He ultimately recuperated at the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center at the James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital in Tampa, Fla.

Although he did not sustain the loss of any limbs, his left leg was completely paralyzed from the knee down, leaving him unable to walk on his own. Meanwhile, he watched fellow patients who had lost limbs begin to run and jump with the help of prosthetics. So disheartening was the experience that Capt. O'Donnell asked to have his leg amputated so he too could enjoy the mobility that amputee patients were experiencing.

Ultimately, as Capt. O'Donnell explained, he accepted the counsel of his physicians, and opted to rehabilitate his injured leg. After returning to Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, he was fitted for a custom orthotic device that now allows him to walk without assistance, despite significant paralysis of his left leg below his knee. Now, after training and rehabilitation, he walks with only a slight limp and runs regularly.

In 2009, O'Donnell returned to duty, took command of the company of soldiers as the larger Stryker Brigade to which it belongs headed back to Iraq. His Commander said O'Donnell was the "ideal choice" to lead the soldiers of "HHC," which provides support for the Stryker Brigade's battalions. "First off, he's a tremendously inspirational individual and leader," Frost said. "He has been through more than most people go through in their life."

O'Donnell, who a couple of months ago completed a triathlon -- 500-meter swim, 12-mile bike segment and 5-kilometer run, admits the road back hasn't been easy.

"I cannot even begin to describe to you how difficult it was. It was definitely without question the hardest thing I've ever done in my life," he said of his recovery.

He was bedridden for two months. He was in a wheelchair for four months after that.

"I had to literally learn how to walk again in a pool," said O'Donnell, who still has to wear a prosthetic-like brace that supports his lower left leg.

Dr. Steven Scott

Dr. Steven Scott from the James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital in Tampa, Florida is the Medical Director of the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center; Chief of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Assistant Professor, University of South Florida College of Medicine; Program Director of the Rehab Medicine and Spinal Cord Injury Residency Programs; Principle Investigator of the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Program. Dr. Scott was the recipient of the Olin E. Teague Award that is the highest award for treating War-Related Injuries in the VA in 2004, received the Commander Award as VA Employee of the Year from the Disable Veterans of American in 2007. Dr. Scott has made numerous presentations on the Polytrauma System of Care throughout the Nation as well as appearances on National Television and Newspapers and has testified before congress on care for military veterans.

Dr. Scott is a 1972 graduate of Springfield College where he was a member of the swimming team and achieved CSCAA All-American Status. He is listed among the school's Distinguished alumni and returns to speak at the college.

Dr. Scott was a part of the team of physicians involved with Captain O'Donnell recovery and rehabilitation.

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