NCAA Division I Women’s Championships: Day Two Prelims

Visit Swimming World’s Event Landing Page for complete coverage of the meet.

AUSTIN, Texas, March 18. THE second day of prelims is complete at the NCAA Division I Women’s Championships held at the Lee and Joe Jamail Texas Swimming Center on the campus of the University of Texas.

200 medley relay
Southern California’s Presley Bard, Kasey Carlson, Lyndsay DePaul and Christel Simms threw down the gauntlet in the first heat of the sprint medley relay with a top-seeded time of 1:36.49, while Wisconsin’s Maggie Meyer, Ashley Wanland, Rebecka Palm and Beckie Thompson finished second with a 1:36.59. Texas A&M’s Tess Simpson, Breeja Larson, Paige Miller and Maria Sommer also cleared 1:37 with a third-seeded 1:36.69. None of the three top seeds have ever won the event in NCAA history.

California (1:37.05), Auburn (1:37.16), Arizona (1:37.41), Arizona State (1:37.42) and Texas (1:37.48) each made the championship finale.

Minnesota (1:37.54), Florida (1:38.08), LSU (1:38.23), North Carolina (1:38.44), Stanford (1:38.56), Tennessee (1:38.77), Kentucky (1:39.10) and Georgia (1:39.51) will swim for points in the B final.

Top 10 Average Scoring Running Projections*:
Southern California (151.5), California (144.5), Georgia (138.25), Arizona (128.5), Stanford (125.25), Auburn (109.5), Texas (97.5), Wisconsin (85.5), Minnesota (76.25), Texas A&M (68.5)

400 IM
After what proved to be more of a warm-up day on day one, Florida’s Elizabeth Beisel rattled the pool record in one of her specialty events with a sterling time of 4:02.34. That swim stands as 14th best all time, just off Summer Sanders’ 1992 pool record of 4:02.28. Beisel has enough in the gas tank to go much faster, as she dropped a lifetime best of 4:00.83 at SECs this year to move to fifth all time. If Beisel pulls off the win, it would tie Florida with Stanford for the most 400 IM victories in NCAA history at seven each.

USC’s Katinka Hosszu will be looking for her second individual title of the meet after winning the 200 IM last night. She checked in with a 4:03.09, but has been much faster with a second-ranked 4:00.03 to her credit.

Stanford’s Maya Dirado (4:04.18), California’s Caitlin Leverenz (4:04.97), Indiana’s Allysa Vavra (4:05.08), Texas A&M’s Sarah Henry (4:05.75), Florida’s Teresa Crippen (4:06.31) and Georgia’s Jana Mangimelli (4:06.65) comprise the rest of the championship heat.

Georgia’s Melanie Margalis (4:07.24), USC’s Stina Gardell (4:07.31), Texas A&M’s Cammile Adams (4:07.62), Virginia’s Claire Crippen (4:07.69), UCLA’s Lauren Hall (4:08.39), Florida’s Jennie Smith (4:08.69), USC’s Haley Anderson (4:09.29) and Stanford’s Andy Taylor (4:09.41) will swim in the consolation heat.

Top 10 Average Scoring Running Projections*:
Southern California (175.5), California (159.25), Georgia (157.625), Stanford (144.625), Arizona (128.5), Auburn (109.5), Texas (97.5), Florida (96.375), Texas A&M (87.875), Wisconsin (85.5)

100 fly
Southern California’s Lyndsay DePaul continued what is likely a strong point-scoring day for the Trojans with a top-seeded 51.71. USC has never won an NCAA title in the women’s 100 fly, and DePaul should have more left tonight as her personal best stands as a 12th-ranked 51.34 from Pac 10s last month.

California’s Amanda Sims also cleared 52 seconds with a 51.91, and will be looking to reclaim her 2009 title in the event that she lost to Stanford’s Elaine Breeden last year. Western Kentucky’s Claire Donahue (51.97) also went sub-52, while California’s Hannah Wilson qualified fourth in 52.20.

LSU’s Jane Trepp (52.46), Tennessee’s Jennifer Connolly (52.47), Auburn’s Olivia Scott (52.54) and LSU’s Amanda Kendall (52.58) also made the big final. California will pick up big points in the team battle with two up.

Maryland’s Megan Lafferty (52.59), Tennessee’s Kelsey Floyd (52.60), California’s Colleen Fotsch (52.62), Michigan’s Caitlin Dauw (52.64), Minnesota’s Kaylee Jamison (52.69), Boise State’s Amber Boucher (52.71), Southern California’s Yumi So (52.71) and Arizona’s State’s Caroline Kuczynski (52.79) will also be looking to maximize points this evening out of the consolation heat.

Top 10 Average Scoring Running Projections*:
Southern California (194.875), California (193.375), Georgia (157.625), Stanford (144.625), Arizona (128.5), Auburn (124.25), Texas (97.5), Florida (96.375), Texas A&M (87.875), Wisconsin (85.5)

200 free
Georgia showed signs of things to come in the 800 free relay with a 1-2-3 presence in the A final. Morgan Scroggy blasted a 1:42.99 to break the pool record of 1:43.28 set by Nicole Haislett. Meanwhile, Allison Schmitt (1:43.40) and Megan Romano (1:43.74) qualified second and third for the Bulldogs. Georgia will be looking for its fourth title in the event’s history, while Schmitt will hope to defend her 2010 title. Maritza Correia (2000) and Kara Lynn Joyce (2006) were the other winners.

California’s Sara Isakovic (1:43.75), Texas’ Karlee Bispo (1:43.77), Virginia’s Lauren Perdue (1:43.97), Florida’s Shara Stafford (1:44.11) and Stanford’s Kate Dwelley (1:44.14) also earned spots in the championship heat.

Georgia’s Shannon Vreeland (1:44.23) and Chelsea Nauta (1:44.78) gave Georgia a three up, two down situation with ninth and 12th-seed finishes. Indiana’s Brittany Strumbel (1:44.29), Arizona’s Alyssa Anderson (1:44.29), Tennessee’s Lindsay Gendron (1:45.01), Ohio State’s Samantha Cheverton (1:45.06), Indiana’s Margaux Farrell (1:45.07) and Florida’s Jamie Bohunicky (1:45.15) earned the rest of the scoring spots.

Top 10 Average Scoring Running Projections*:
Georgia (211.125), California (208.125), Southern California (194.875), Stanford (159.375), Arizona (133.125), Auburn (124.25), Florida (115.75), Texas (112.25), Texas A&M (87.875), Wisconsin (85.5)

100 breast
Minnesota’s Jillian Tyler smoked prelims with a top time of 58.48, which stands as the eighth-fastest ever in the event’s history. Tyler has been faster with a third-ranked 58.22 from last year. Minnesota has only won the event once in the school’s history with Gretchen Hegener nabbing the 1997 NCAA title with a 1:00.32.

Texas A&M’s Breeja Larson turned in a second-seeded 59.03 to jump into 10th on the all time list. Southern California’s Kasey Carlson earned the third seed in 59.29. Texas’ Laura Sogar (59.50), Arizona’s Ellyn Baumgardner (59.57), Wisconsin’s Ashley Wanland (59.61), George Mason’s Ashley Danner (59.63) and LSU’s Jane Trepp (59.95) will also compete for the title this evening.

The surprise of the morning came when Arizona State’s Rebecca Ejdervik was disqualified. Ejdervik came into the meet as a national title contender with a 58.90 seed.

Tennessee’s Martina Moravcikov (1:00.09), Florida’s Hrafnhildur Luthersdottir (1:00.10), Minnesota’s Haley Spencer (1:00.24), Toledo’s Laura Lindsay (1:00.33), South Carolina’s Amanda Rutqvist (1:00.50), Stanford’s Elizabeth Smith (1:00.54), Penn State’s Merritt Krawczyk (1:00.56) and Louisville’s Theresa Bergstrom (1:00.62) moved into the consolation heat.

Top 10 Average Scoring Running Projections*:
Georgia (211.125), Southern California (209.625), California (208.125), Stanford (164), Arizona (147.875), Texas (127), Auburn (124.25), Florida (120.375), Texas A&M (102.625), Wisconsin (100.25), Minnesota (100.25)

100 back
California’s Deborah Roth became the first potential surprise NCAA titlist of the meet by dropping nearly two seconds from her seed time to lead the way in the backstroke prelims. Entering the meet with a 53.20 seed, Roth vaulted up to 11th all time in the event with a scorching time of 51.61. Roth will be looking to give California an NCAA-record tying sixth NCAA title in the event. Natalie Coughlin nabbed four titles from 2001-04, while Marylyn Chiang won in 1999. Stanford leads the way with sixth titles.

Wisconsin’s Maggie Meyer (52.10), Tennessee’s Jennifer Connolly (52.23), Georgia’s Megan Romano (52.35), Southern California’s Presley Bard (52.38), Texas A&M’s Paige Miller (52.43), North Carolina’s Carly Smith (52.44) and California’s Cindy Tran (52.54) picked up the rest of the transfer spots into the A final.

SMU’s Therese Svendsen (52.79), Arizona’s Sarah Denninghoff (52.87), Stanford’s Betsy Webb (52.92), Georgia’s Kristen Shickora (52.96), Auburn’s Emily Bos (53.13), Kentucky’s Chatham Penrod (53.23), California’s Colleen Fotsch (53.26) and Wyoming’s Kelsey Conci (53.28) pocketed the B final lanes.

Top 10 Average Scoring Running Projections*:
California (242.25), Georgia (230.5), Southern California (224.375), Stanford (168.625), Arizona (152.5), Auburn (128.875), Texas (127), Florida (120.375), Texas A&M (117.375), Wisconsin (115)

Three-Meter Diving
Minnesota’s Kelci Bryant will be looking to become the first back-to-back NCAA titlist in the event since USC’s Blythe Hartley won in 2005 and 2006. Bryant will also be vying for her second title of the meet after winning the one-meter yesterday, after posting a 391.70 during prelims today.

Purdue’s Erin Mertz (353.50), Ohio State’s Bianca Alvarez (349.25), Florida’s Monica Dodson (346.35), Duke’s Abby Johnston (338.45), Miami (Florida)’s Carrie Dragland (337.50), Texas’ Shelby Cullinan (333.75) and Texas’ Maren Taylor (331.40) also made the championship final.

Iowa’s Deidre Freeman (327.60), Kentucky’s Lisa Faulkner (324.20), Missouri’s Loren Figueroa (324.05), Georgia’s Hannah Moore (322.95), Arizona State’s Elina Eggers (319.40), Stanford’s Stephanie Phipps (316.85), Houston’s Lacey Truelove (313.90) and Stanford’s Margaret Hostage (311.90) will be competing for points shortly in the consolation session.

Top 10 Average Scoring Running Projections*:
California (242.25), Georgia (235.125), Southern California (224.375), Stanford (177.875), Texas (156.5), Arizona (152.5), Florida (135.125), Auburn (128.875), Texas A&M (117.375), Wisconsin (115), Minnesota (115)

* Average Scoring Projections based on the average points allotted to an A finalist (14.75) and a B finalist (4.625). Double points for relays.

Swimming World’s NCAA Division I Women’s Championships Notes Package Sponsored by NISCA

Comments Off

Author: Archive Team

Current Swimming World Issue


Trouble Viewing on Smart Phones, Tablets or iPads? Click Here