Swimming World Presents “Up & Comers: Swim Neptune’s Keaton Jones”

Swimming World October 2019 Up and Comers Keaton Jones

Up & Comers: Swim Neptune’s Keaton Jones

By Shoshanna Rutemiller

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Swim Neptune’s Keaton Jones made headlines when he qualified for the 2020 U.S. Olympic Trials in the 200 backstroke as a 14-year-old. But the high school freshman is more than a phenomenal swimmer. The straight-A student solves Rubik’s Cubes in 30 seconds, plays the cello, takes hip-hop dance classes, and placed third in the Arizona district cross country championships!

In July, Keaton swam a 2:01.20 200 meter backstroke—more than a second under the OT cut of 2:02.99 and faster than Aaron Peirsol’s legendary 13-14 boys’ record of 2:02.78 set in 1998, which was first broken last March by Flood Aquatics’ (Fla.) Joshua Zuchowski (2:00.97).

“Keaton is an extremely hard-working athlete both in and out of the water,” says his coach, Alex Popa. “He is self-motivated, goal-oriented, and he always keeps a positive attitude. He is what I like to call a 24/7 athlete.”

Swimming World: What is your favorite thing about swimming?
Keaton Jones: I love the hang time at the wall. Even if it’s just a nod, high-five or just catching our breath, my teammates and I are all in it together, suffering together and getting faster and stronger together.

To read more about Up & Comer Keaton Jones,
check out the October issue of Swimming World, out now!

Swimming World October 2019 Cover Daiya Seto

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FEATURES

024 MYSTERIES OF OUR MUSEUM: A MYSTERIOUS MEDAL
by Bruce Wigo
A beautiful bronze medal commemorating a Japan-USA-Denmark International Swimming Meet led to the story of the best all-around woman swimmer from the early 1950s who also became one of the best Masters swimmers ever: Gail Peters Roper.

026 TAKEOFF TO TOKYO: DAWN OF GREATNESS
by John Lohn
When the 2020 Olympic Games open next July, there will be no round-number anniversary of what Australian Dawn Fraser accomplished 56 years earlier in 1964. Rather, it is the site of the Olympiad that resonates. As Tokyo prepares to host the world’s finest athletes, it also serves as the place where Fraser became the first swimmer ever to win Olympic gold in the same event at three consecutive Games—a feat that, even now, is wildly difficult to comprehend.

030 IT’S TIME FOR SOME RESPECT
by John Lohn
For someone to boast four World titles and seven individual medals from the World Championships, the instant assumption is that he stands out as one of the biggest names in the sport. Sure, Japan’s Daiya Seto is respected by his rivals and generally around the pool, but his exploits are greater than the recognition that has been given.

034 FASTER THAN EVER
by David Rieder
Heading into the 2020 Olympics, a young American sprint corps has turned the United States into heavy gold-medal favorites in both the 100 free and 400 free relay. However, the real contest will come at the U.S. Trials, where Olympic hopefuls must get through a cutthroat gauntlet of speed in order to earn their spots for Tokyo.

038 THE NEW “KIDS” ON THE BLOCK
by Craig Lord
This month marks the beginning of a new era in swimming with the unveiling of the International Swimming League, featuring a new and dynamic format of swimming that includes a global Pro-Team tour with some of the world’s greatest swimmers in action.

COACHING

010 LESSONS WITH THE LEGENDS: KAREN MOE HUMPHREYS
by Michael J. Stott

014 SWIMMING TECHNIQUE CONCEPTS: SHOULDER INJURY PREVENTION FOR THE FREESTYLE ARM ENTRY
by Rod Havriluk
Every team’s injury management plan should include strategies to address the freestyle arm entry and prevent shoulder injury. Major benefits also include increasing the index of coordination and, thereby, increasing swimming velocity.

016 A CASE FOR HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING: ALL FOR ONE, ONE FOR ALL
by Michael J. Stott
The verdict is unanimous: high school swimming adds immeasurable value to the career and experience of a young athlete.

051 Q&A WITH COACH TERRY JONES
by Michael J. Stott

052 HOW THEY TRAIN KAITLYNN SIMS AND LILLIE NORDMANN
by Michael J. Stott

TRAINING

013 DRYSIDE TRAINING: BUILDING LEAN MUSCLE
by J.R. Rosania

JUNIOR SWIMMER

042 GOLDMINDS: BUILDING A TEAM OF GREAT SWIMMING PARENTS
by Wayne Goldsmith
When given the opportunity to understand the importance of their role and their influence, swimming parents can become the most powerful, positive force in their child’s life.

054 UP & COMERS: KEATON JONES
by Shoshanna Rutemiller

COLUMNS & SPECIAL SECTIONS

008 A VOICE FOR THE SPORT

009 BEYOND THE YARDS

018 DID YOU KNOW? MARTHA NORELIUS

019 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

044 PREP SCHOOL DIRECTORY

055 GUTTERTALK

056 PARTING SHOT

3 comments

  1. Jacki Nabor

    I watched him swim that 2:01! Very impressive! Keep it up, kid!!!!

  2. avatar
    Anonymous

    I saw him swim the 2:01! Very impressive! Keep working hard, kid!