Dryside Training by Commit Swimming: Want More Pulling Power?

april-cover-graphic

Introducing Dryside Training!  Dryland exercises specifically designed to help swimmers and other aquatics athletes improve their performance in the water.

Thinking your pull phase of your stroke is weak? Not grabbing enough water with each stroke?

Fear not! Here are four exercises that can help you produce more power to catch and pull more water—thus creating more distance per stroke.

Perform 12 to 15 reps per exercise and two to three sets. Discontinue exercises one week prior to a taper meet.

Far too many swimmers spin their arms through the water without grabbing enough water, thereby limiting the amount of speed they can create. What they need to do is to grab more water and use it like resistance to push against for speed and distance.

These movements will train the swimmer on land to use the resistance as water, and in doing so, create more power. Get some resistance bands and medicine balls or utilize your gym equipment.

So, hit the gym and work on that pull.

exercise one - one arm throw down

exercise two - two arm throw down

exercise three - tube stroke

exercise four - cable straight bar pulldown

Notice: All swimming and dryland training instruction should be performed under the supervision of a qualified coach or instructor, and in circumstances that ensure the safety of the participants.

JR Rosania-trainer-dryside-training

 

 

 

 

 

 

MEET THE TRAINER

 

J.R. Rosania, B.S., exercise science, is one of the nation’s top performance enhancement coaches. He is the owner and CEO of Healthplex, LLC, and has finished the Ironman Triathlon 18 times. He also serves as Swimming World Magazine’s fitness trainer and was named one of “America’s Top Trainers” by Men’s Journal and Vogue magazines. Check out Rosania’s website at www.jrhealthplex.net.

 

Noriko Inada-swimmer-athlete-dryside-training

 

 

 

 

 

 

MEET THE ATHLETE

Noriko Inada, 39, swam for Japan at the 1992, 2000 and 2004 Olympics. She now swims Masters for Phoenix Swim Club, and owns Masters world records in the women’s 25-29, 30-34 and 35-39 age groups.