Ella Eastin and Chase Kalisz Top Seeds in Two Events Each in Final Mesa Prelims

Photo Courtesy: Reginald Dunwoody

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During the final morning of prelims at the arena Pro Swim Series meet in Mesa, Ella Eastin and Chase Kalisz each captured the top seeds in two individual events. Although Eastin has scratched will not compete in either event in finals, Kalisz will attempt the grueling 200 fly-200 IM double.

Read full coverage from the prelims session below.

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Women’s 200 Fly

Stanford’s Ella Eastin pulled away from Cardinal’s Kelsi Worrell in the final heat, and Eastin became the top seed for the evening final. She touched in 2:11.81, six tenths ahead of Texas’ Lauren Case (2:12.41). Worrell ended up securing the third seed with her time of 2:12.65.

New Zealand’s Helena Gasson qualified fourth in 2:13.84, well ahead of Shroeder YMCA’s Hannah Saiz (2:15.65), Texas Ford’s Ashlyn Fiorilli (2:16.39), Trojan’s Haley Anderson (2:16.82) and Neptune Natation’s Mary-Sophie Harvey (2:17.15).

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Men’s 200 Fly

North Baltimore’s Chase Kalisz was the only swimmer to crack 2:00 in the men’s 200 fly, coming in at 1:59.68. He was more than a second ahead of the rest of the field, as Louisville’s Zach Harting qualified second in 2:00.79, and SMU’s Jonathan Gomez took third in 2:00.93.

Cal’s Tom Shields looked strong for the first 175 meters, but he faded to fourth in 2:01.30. Singapore’s Zheng Wen Quah was fifth in 2:01.44, followed by Hector Ruvalcaba Cruz (2:01.85), Brendan Meyer (2:02.61) and Taylor Abbott (2:02.65).

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Women’s 100 Breast

Tennessee Aquatics’ Molly Hannis stormed to the top time of the morning, touching the wall in heat seven in 1:06.79. Katie Meili gave it a run in the next heat but ended up seeded second in 1:06.98. Both have been a touch quicker already this year, as Hannis ranks fourth in the world in 1:06.47 and Meili eighth in 1:06.91.

Louisville’s Andrea Cottrell qualified well back in third in 1:08.69, while New York Athletic Club’s Breeja Larson (1:08.75) and Texas’ Madisyn Cox (1:08.97) were also in the 1:08-range.

Fort Collins’ Zoe Bartel (1:09.60), St. Petersburg’s Melanie Margalis (1:10.27) and USC’s Riley Scott (1:11.57) also got into the A-heat.

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Men’s 100 Breast

Kevin Cordes posted by far the top time of the morning when he touched in 1:01.09, more than a full second ahead of anyone else in the field. Louisville’s Carlos Claverie finished second in 1:02.25, and Brazil’s Rafael Rodrigues came in third at 1:02.49.

Cal’s Josh Prenot, already the 200 breast winner and 200 IM runner-up in Mesa, was fourth in 1:02.50. Miguel De Lara Ojeda took fourth in 1:02.62, followed by Tennessee’s Brad Craig (1:02.79), Race Pace Club’s Michael Andrew (1:02.88) and Trojan’s Azad Al-Barazi (1:02.92).

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Women’s 100 Back

Club Wolverine’s Ali DeLoof recorded a time of 1:00.55 to finish well ahead of the field in her signature event. Denmark’s Mie Nielsen was a full second behind in 1:01.56, but the two should go head-to-head in an excellent race in the final. Nielsen currently ranks seventh in the world in 59.81, with DeLoof just behind at 59.82.

Trojan’s Kendyl Stewart qualified third in 1:02.14, while Stanford’s Simone Manuel, making a rare appearance in a backstroke race, was fourth in 1:02.16. Just behind was Texas’ Claire Adams, the 2015 U.S. National champion in the event, at 1:02.17.

Stanford’s Erin Voss (1:03.05), Fort Collins’ Bayley Stewart (1:03.16) and Aquazot’s Eva Merrell (1:03.28) finished sixth through eighth, respectively.

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Men’s 100 Back

Tucson Ford’s Matt Grevers cruised to the top seed in his best event. The 2012 Olympic gold medalist in the event came in at 55.33, about two seconds short of his best time this season, a 53.31 that ranks third in the world.

Grevers should have some competition in the final as Cal’s Jacob Pebley and Academy Bullets’ Sean Lehane tied for second in 55.51, with New York Athletic Club’s Arkady Vyatchanin was fourth in 55.75.

Auburn’s Petter Fredriksson also got under 56 in qualifying fifth, his time 55.99, and the rest of the A-final will include Arizona State’s Cameron Craig (56.01), USC’s Dylan Carter (56.18) and Luck Pechmann (57.82).

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Women’s 200 IM

Stanford’s Ella Eastin captured the top seed with a time of 2:14.04, but she will have some company in the A-final. The American record-holder in the short course yards version of the event was followed closely by Neptune Natation’s Mary-Sophie Harvey (2:14.38), Texas’ Madisyn Cox (2:14.79) and St. Petersburg’s Melanie Margalis (2:14.94).

Scottsdale’s Taylor Ruck captured the fifth seed in 2:15.47. The race was Ruck’s first of the meet after competing at Canada’s National Championships last week in Victoria.

Stanford’s Katie Drabot (2:16.03), USC’s Louise Hansson (2:16.18) and New Zealand’s Helena Gasson (2:17.25) also made the A-final. Stanford’s Katie Ledecky finished tenth in 2:18.93.

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Men’s 200 IM

Chase Kalisz, already the winner of the 400 IM in Mesa and already the top seed into the 200 fly final, qualified first in the 200 IM in 2:03.01. He was about three tenths ahead of New Zealand’s Bradlee Ashby, who took second in 2:03.35, and Cal’s Josh Prenot grabbed third in 2:03.79.

Louisville’s Carlos Claverie qualified fourth in 2:04.34, ahead of Race Pace Club’s Michael Andrew (2:04.52). Michael Weiss (2:05.53), Brazil’s Henrique Rodrigues (2:06.26) and Pitchfork’s Jarod Arroyo (2:06.61) also finished in the top eight.

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Author: David Rieder

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David Rieder is a staff writer for Swimming World. He has contributed to the magazine and website since 2009, and he has covered the NCAA Championships, U.S. Nationals, Olympic Trials as well as the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio and the 2017 World Championships in Budapest. He is a native of Charleston, S.C., and a 2016 graduate of Duke University.

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