Pan Pacific Championships, Results: Cameron McEvoy Scorches Pan Pacs Record to Win 100 Free

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GOLD COAST, Australia, August 22. IN a bit of a stunner, Australia’s Cameron McEvoy crushed the field in the men’s 100-meter free for the win in 47.82 at the Pan Pacific Championships.  That performance lowered Nathan Adrian’s Pan Pacific Championship record of 48.05 from prelims, and delivered the sprint title back to Australia for the first time since Michael Klim (1997, 1999) and Ian Thorpe (2002) won the award three straight years for the Aussies.

McEvoy was unable to duplicate his second-ranked season best of 47.65 from Australian Nationals, but he had more than enough to win tonight as USA’s Nathan Adrian was unable to put together a successful title defense as he wound up with silver in 48.30.

James Magnussen of Australia, who leads the world this year with a 47.59 from the Australian Aquatic Super Series, finished third in 48.36, while USA’s Michael Phelps just missed the podium in his first chance since returning from his 18-month retirement.  Phelps wound up posting a fourth-place 48.51.

Brazil’s Nicolas Oliveira (48.69), Japan’s Katsumi Nakamura (48.96), Brazil’s Joao de Lucca (48.97) and Japan’s Shinri Shioura (49.08) rounded out the A final.

A Final Results

  1 MCEVOY, CAMERON  20 AUSTRALIA           48.49      47.82P  943  
    r:+0.19  22.84        47.82 (24.98)
  2 ADRIAN, NATHAN   25 UNITED STATES       48.05      48.30   916  
    r:+0.65  22.87        48.30 (25.43)
  3 MAGNUSSEN, JAME  23 AUSTRALIA           48.25      48.36   912  
    r:+0.69  23.12        48.36 (25.24)
  4 PHELPS, MICHAEL  29 UNITED STATES       48.45      48.51   904  
    r:+0.68  23.82        48.51 (24.69)
  5 OLIVEIRA, NICOL  27 BRAZIL              49.13      48.69   894  
    r:+0.65  23.38        48.69 (25.31)
  6 NAKAMURA, KATSU  20 JAPAN               49.30      48.96   879  
    r:+0.65  23.62        48.96 (25.34)
  7 DE LUCCA, JOAO   24 BRAZIL              49.02      48.97   879  
    r:+0.66  23.94        48.97 (25.03)
  8 SHIOURA, SHINRI  22 JAPAN               49.53      49.08   873

Brazil’s Marcelo Chierighini stopped the clock in 48.68 to win the B final of the 100 free.  Australia’s Matt Abood placed second in 49.17 with USA’s Anthony Ervin earning third in 49.20.

Canada’s Yuri Kisil (49.51), Japan’s Takuro Fujii (50.01), Canada’s Luke Peddie (50.16), Hong Kong’s Geoff Cheah (50.20) and South Africa’s Doug Erasmus (50.94) comprised the rest of the consolation heat.

B Final Results

  9 CHIERIGHINI, MA  23 BRAZIL              49.31      48.68   894  
    r:+0.68  23.50        48.68 (25.18)
 10 ABOOD, MATTHEW   28 AUSTRALIA           49.13      49.17   868  
    r:+0.71  23.31        49.17 (25.86)
 11 ERVIN, ANTHONY   33 UNITED STATES       49.11      49.20   866  
    r:+0.65  22.57        49.20 (26.63)
 12 KISIL, YURI      18 CANADA              49.65      49.51   850  
    r:+0.73  24.12        49.51 (25.39)
 13 FUJII, TAKURO    29 JAPAN               49.75      50.01   825  
    r:+0.60  24.16        50.01 (25.85)
 14 PEDDIE, LUKE     21 CANADA              50.07      50.16   817  
    r:+0.63  23.75        50.16 (26.41)
 15 CHEAH, GEOFFREY  23 HONG KONG           50.52      50.20   815  
    r:+0.64  24.04        50.20 (26.16)
 16 ERASMUS, DOUGLA  24 SOUTH AFRICA        50.78      50.94   780  
    r:+0.57  23.95        50.94 (26.99)

 

3 Comments

3 comments

  1. José

    So, Phelps had the best 2nd 50. I think he should consider the 200 Free.

  2. lolly

    Only stunning in that Magnussen is swimming so slowly. Adrian has swum under 48 maybe twice in his career? McEvoy has already done that three times this year.

    • commonwombat

      Magnussen is “nursing” some back issues.

Author: Jason Marsteller

Jason Marsteller is the general manager of digital properties at Swimming World. He joined Swimming World in June 2006 as the managing editor after previous stints as a media relations professional at Indiana University, the University of Tennessee, Southern Utah University and the Utah Summer Games.

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