Harry Homans Breaks RWU Pool Record at Swimming World Fall Classic

Photo Courtesy: David Rieder

Harry Homans took down the Roger Williams University pool record in the men’s 1650 free on the first evening of the Swimming World Fall Classic in Bristol, R.I.

Homans dominated the event and won in 15:52.87, more than four seconds under the previous pool record of 15:56.95.

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Homans’ teammate Aislin Farris won the women’s 1650 free in 17:09.85.

The 1650 was the only senior age group event Friday evening, and in the 12-and-under division, both the 500 free and 400 IM were contested.

In the girls’ 500 free, Bluefish’s Erin Kelly was the only 8-and-under swimmer, winning in 8:03.35. Infinity’s Izzy Balboni won for 9-10s in 5:58.30, and older sister Gwen Balboni, also of Infinity, won the 11-12 race in 5:47.15.

For the boys’ equivalent event, Bluefish’s Luca Guerra won for 8-and-unders (8:22.40), Bluefish’s Alex Parent won 9-10s (6:38.73) and Bluefish’s James Misto won the 11-12 event in a quick 5:10.95.

The 10-and-under girls’ 400 IM went to Bluefish’s Addison MacDonald (5:38.82), and her teammate Natalia Robak won the 11-12 event in 5:07.70.

Finally, Bluefish’s Nick Cavic won the 10-and-under boys’ 400 IM in 5:03.05, and Bluefish’s Josh Parent took first in the 11-12 boys’ event in 4:48.13.

Full results

All 12-and-under races and the fastest women’s and men’s race from the 1650 free are available to watch on-demand. Swimming World is live streaming the afternoon and evening finals sessions of the meet over the weekend, beginning Saturday and Sunday at 1:30 p.m. and 6:15 p.m. ET.

Check out the full playlist of Friday evening’s videos below. Click on the icon in the top left-hand corner to find a list and pick which race you want to watch.

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Author: David Rieder

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David Rieder is the host of Swimming World TV and a staff writer for Swimming World. A contributor to the magazine and website since 2009, he has covered the NCAA Championships, U.S. Nationals, Olympic Trials as well as the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio and the 2017 World Championships in Budapest. He is a native of Charleston, S.C., and a 2016 graduate of Duke University.

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