Dryland Tip: Bunkie Adductor Plyometric Progression

By G. John Mullen of SwimmingScience.net and CenterofOptimalRestoration.com, Swimming World correspondent

SANTA CLARA, California, December 29. THIS week's Dryland Tip from Dr. G. John Mullen is the Bunkie Adductor Plyometric Progression. It focuses on the breaststroke.

Purpose: In breaststroke, forward velocity is dictated by the legs, specifically adduction (bringing your legs towards midline). Elite breaststrokers are able to rapidly bring their like their feet together, similar to making them clap to accelerate their body in a straight line forward. The core must be tight during this phase of breaststroke or drag will occur. The bunkie adductor plyometric progression is a difficult movement encompassing core stability with adductor activation and power during the plyometric movements.

Directions:
Phase I: Place your hand on a weight (to put the wrist in a neutral position) and top knee and shin on a bench. Next, raise your hips towards the ceiling, keeping your shoulders and hips in line. Hold statically for 30 – 60 seconds.

Phase II: Place your hand on a weight (to put the wrist in a neutral position) and top foot onto a bench. Next, raise your hips towards the ceiling, keeping your shoulders and hips in line. Hold statically for 30 – 60 seconds.

Phase III: Return to the phase I position, slightly abduct (moving away from midline) your top leg, then rapidly push your top thigh into the bench, to lift your top leg off the bench. Perform 3-6 repetitions.

Phase IV: Return to the phase I position, slightly abduct your top leg, then rapidly push your top foot into the bench, to lift your top leg off the bench. Perform 3-6 repetitions.

Dr. G. John Mullen is a Doctor of Physical Therapy and a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. At USC, he was a clinical research assistant at USC performing research on adolescent diabetes, lung adaptations to swimming, and swimming biomechanics. G. John has been featured in Swimming World Magazine, Swimmer Magazine, and the International Society of Swim Coaches Journal. He is currently the strength and conditioning coach at Santa Clara Swim Club, owner of the Center of Optimal Restoration and creator of Swimming Science.

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