Cecil Russell’s Application for Reinstatement Denied

OTTAWA, Ontario, Canada, August 10. IN a press release sent out today by the Canadian Centre for Ethics, Cecil Russell's application for reinstatement to the coaching ranks has been denied.

In 1997, Russell drew a lifetime suspension for steroid trafficking. In 2003, Russell also plead guilty as part of an ecstasy distribution ring. Russell, however, used the fact that his guilty plea was sealed as part of an attempt to be reinstated in 2006. He claimed that he was exonerated on the 2003 charges. When the files were unsealed, his brief reinstatement was rescinded.

Here is the full press release:
The Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sports (CCES) announced today the release of Arbitrator Mew's decision on the reinstatement of Mr. Cecil Russell as a member of the coaching community in Canada.

After a lengthy hearing process, including applications made to the Ontario Superior Court of Justice and the Ontario Court of Appeal, Arbitrator Graeme Mew, denied Mr. Russell's application for re-instatement.

Swimming Canada was an intervener in these proceedings, which began in the fall of 2008, as the organization that represents competitive swimming in Canada.

"Our organization is pleased with the decision rendered by Arbitrator Mew to uphold the life-time ban on Mr. Cecil Russell," said Pierre Lafontaine, CEO and National Coach for Swimming Canada.

"Swimming Canada seeks to hold its members to the highest ethical standards to ensure that all Swimming Canada sanctioned activities are led by coaches, officials and volunteers who reflect the strong values of our organization."

In 2005, Mr. Russell's reinstatement was set aside by the Ontario Superior Court of Justice before which, Swimming Canada, Coaches of Canada and the CCES successfully argued that the reinstatement was obtained by fraud. The 2009 decision further confirms that to be a coach in Canada one must conform to a high standard of ethical behavior.

Furthermore, a Working group will be established by Coaches of Canada and CCES, in consultation with National Sports Organizations, to examine and ensure that proper mechanisms are in place to enforce a high standard of ethical behavior amongst the Canadian sport system.

More details on Arbitrator Graeme Mew's decision can be found on the CCES website, www.cces.ca.

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Author: Archive Team

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