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IPC Swimming World Championships: Mallory Weggemann Pushes World Record Tally to Five in Second Night -- August 16, 2010

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EINDHOVEN, The Netherlands, August 16. REIGNING Swimming World Disabled Female Swimmer of the Year Mallory Weggemann has certainly made her presence known through two days at the IPC Swimming World Championships. In just two days of swimming, she's already knocked down five world records.

Weggemann clocked her third and fourth world records in two days in the women's 100 breast SB6. After taking down her classification's world records in both the 200 and 400 free during her 400-meter free triumph last night, she picked up a pair of world records again in one swim tonight.


She clocked a 44.90 at the 50-meter mark to lower the 2009 global standard of 46.06 set by Charlotte Henshaw. Weggemann cracked nearly three seconds from Henshaw's preliminary world record of 1:38.46 set this morning with a winning 1:35.51. Henshaw's prelim time had eclipsed her own global mark of 1:39.56 set in May. Henshaw wound up taking second in the finale with a 1:39.74.

Weggemann returned later in the evening to get a piece of her fifth world record in the women's 400 free relay – 34 Points. USA's Ashley Owens, Weggemann, Elizabeth Stone and Jessica Long clocked a blazing fast time of 4:23.59 to obliterate the nation's previous 2006 global mark of 4:30.66.

Brazil's Daniel Dias lowered his own world record in the men's 50 fly S5 with a triumphant time of 34.33. That performance cut more than a second from his previous global mark of 35.63 set in June 2010. USA's Roy Perkins also cleared the previous world record with a second-place 35.56.

Czech Republic's Arnost Petracek crushed his men's 50 fly S4 world record with a winning clocking of 42.62. That effort demolished the 43.81 he also set in June 2010.

Canada's Benoit Huot joined the world-record fun with a sterling time of 2:11.30 in the men's 200 IM SM10. The time smashed the 2008 world record (2:12.78) of Rick Pendleton set at the Beijing Paralympics.

Canada's Summer Ashley Mortimer made it two straight world records for the Canadians with a touch-out victory over New Zealand's Sophie Pascoe, 2:30.14 to 2:30.64, in the women's 200 IM SM10. Mortimer had already set the world record during prelims with a 2:32.91 that shot down Jessica Sloan's 2000 standard of 2:33.64.

Croatia's Mihovil Spanja took down his second world record of the meet with a 1:25.11 in the men's 100 breast SB6. That swim downed the June 2010 global standard of 1:25.38 set by Christoph Burkard. The finish proved to be one of the most exciting of the day with Ukraine's Yevheniy Bohodayko (1:25.30) clearing the previous record and Burkard finished third in 1:25.68.

During prelims of the men's 200 free S2, Russia's Dmitry Kokarev turned in a 4:44.59 to down his world record in the event of 4:45.43 set at the 2008 Paralympics. He then returned in the finale with a swifter time of 4:42.04 to drop his world record even further.

A pair of world records fell during the women's 200 free S1 and S2 finale. Ukraine's Ganna Ielisavetska clocked a 5:06.38 to down the S1 record of 5:29.66 set by Iryna Sotska back in 2009. Sotska placed second in the event tonight in 5:11.65, under her previous world record. Ukraine's Darya Kopayeva posted a 5:12.42 in the S2 division to crush the previous world record of 5:55.77 set by Maria Kalpakidou in 2009.

Ukraine's Dmytro Vynohradets cleared his world record in the men's 200 free S3 with a time of 3:21.96. That effort eclipsed his previous record of 3:22.98 set at the 2008 Paralympics.

Also during prelims, Slovenia's Ales Secnik posted a 1:23.72 in the men's 50 fly S2 event, crushing his record from June of 1:37.26.

Germany's Kirsten Bruhn clocked a time of 1:33.85 in the prelims of the women's 100 breast SB5 to take down her world record of 1:34.02 set in 2009. She then claimed the title in finals with a 1:35.26.

In relay action, Australia's Matthew Levy, Peter Leek, Matthew Cowdrey and Andrew Pasterfield broke the men's 400 free relay – 34 Points world record with a time of 3:48.72. That effort wiped out the 3:51.43 set by Great Britain at the 2008 Paralympics.

Norway's Sarah Louise Rung topped the women's 50 fly S5 with a time of 43.22, while Mexico's Patricia Valle won the women's 50 fly S3 in 1:05.24. Mexico's Patricia Valle claimed the women's 200 free S3 in a time of 4:24.30, while Mexico's Nely Miranda Herrera earned the women's 200 free S4 victory in 3:43.75. Meanwhile, France's David Smetanine clinched the men's 200 free S4 title in 3:01.47.

South Africa's Natalie Du Toit cruised to victory in the women's 200 IM SM9 with a top time of 2:32.11., while Australia's Matthew Cowdrey turned in a 2:14.54 to win the men's 200 IM SM9.

Ukraine's Maksym Veraksa won the men's 100 breast SB12 title in 1:08.04, while Belarus' Uladzimir Izotau placed second in 1:08.55. Ukraine's Viktor Smyrnov topped the men's 100 breast SB11 race with a 1:15.19. Ukraine's Oleksii Fedyna pocketed the men's 100 breast SB13 crown in 1:05.86, while Ukraine's Andriy Kalyna took home the men's 100 breast SB8 title in 1:07.37 – just missing his world record of 1:07.01 set in 2008. Sweden's Anders Olsson earned the men's 100 breast SB5 crown in 1:39.64. Australia's Blake Cochrane snared the men's 100 breast SB7 title in 1:24.44.

Sweden's Maja Reichard touched out Argentina's Nadia Baez, 1:34.34 to 1:34.59, in the women's 100 breast SB11 finale. Cyprus' Karolina Pelendritou won the women's 100 breast SB12 in 1:18.36. Canada's Chelsey Gotell touched out teammate Valeria Grand-Maison, 1:23.10 to 1:23.27, in the women's 100 breast SB13 finale. Russia's Olesya Vladykina followed in the women's 100 breast SB8 with a top time of 1:20.98 for the win. USA's Erin Popovich (1:32.47) and Jessica Long (1:33.06) went 1-2 in the women's 100 breast SB7.

Day Two Finals Results


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