Xu Jiayu Misses 100 Back World Record By 0.01 in China

Photo Courtesy: Rob Schumacher-USA TODAY Sports

Xu Jiayu was the Olympic silver medalist in the men’s 100 back last summer in Rio, but he figures to pose a huge challenge to Ryan Murphy in the event at this summer’s World Championships after Xu swam the second-fastest time in history in the event on day three of China’s national swimming championships in Quindao.

Xu blasted a 51.86, just one hundreth off Murphy’s world record of 51.85 set in Rio. It is the second-fastest performance in history, and Xu broke Ryosuke Irie’s Asian record of 52.24 from 2009 and surpassed names like Aaron PeirsolMatt Grevers and Camille Lacourt on the all-time list in the event.

The time obviously ranks as the top time in the world this year, well ahead of the 53.13 posted a day earlier by Evgeny Rylov at the Russian championships.

Finishing second in that race was Li Guangyang in 53.61, the sixth-best time in the world this year, and Hu Yixuan touched third in 54.51.

Also posting the fastest time in the world was Sun Yang, who won the 200 free in 1:44.91. He now ranks No. 1 in the world by far in both the 200 and 400-meter events. Wang Shun moved to third in the world by finishing second in 1:46.57, and Ji Xinjie came in third at 1:47.98.

In the women’s 100 back, Fu Yuanhui became the third woman this year to break 59 seconds, joining Emily Seebohm and the woman with whom she shared Olympic bronze, Kylie Masse. Fu won that event in 58.72, the third-best time in the world, while Chen Jie finished second in 59.43 to move to fourth in the world. Wang Xueer touched third in 1:00.13.

Shi Jinglin dominated the women’s 100 breast, touching in 1:06.94. That time ranks eighth in the world this year and was more than enough to beat out Viann Zhang (1:08.05) and Liu Xiaoyu (1:08.49).

Hou Yawen won the women’s 1500 free in 16:13.37, and Chen Yejie took second in 16:19.80. Those times ranked fourth and eighth in the world, respectively. Xin Xin was third in 16:27.54.

In semifinal action, Yan Zibei qualified first for the men’s 50 breast final in 27.38, ranked No. 6 in the world this year, and ahead of Wang Lizhuo (27.52) and Li Xiang (27.55). Li Zhuhao, coming off a Chinese record in the men’s 50 fly, paced the 200 fly semis in 1:56.37, well ahead of Yu Yingbiao (1:58.14) and Wang Zhao (1:58.37).

Ai Yanhan edged out 15-year-old Li Bingjie for the top seed in the women’s 200 free final, 1:56.88 to 1:56.93. Those times rank seventh and eighth in the world this year, respectively. Liu Zixuan touched third in 1:57.30.

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40 Comments

40 comments

    • Liong Jee Xerc

      Sometimes u have to accept the fact bro.

    • Leon Chien

      Pablo…. what made you think he is a doper? Just because he is a swimmer from China? Without any facts and evidence to call a swimmer doper…. you are a disgrace!

      • avatar
        blaise.vera0

        hahahahaha…no…he can think whatever he wants. the proof is just when he takes the real drug test

    • Nick Destrampe

      It’s a fact that China and Russia have had the most issues with doping in the past couple years. China had six alone in the last year and a half. They routinely get these great swimmers who peak for a year or two, get busted and then fall off the map. Sun Yang is about the only one who has had a good reason, when he took medication for heart palpitations, but it never benefited him in the water.

    • Pablo Valedon

      Yo Leon!, I’m saying it for any athlete from any where in the world. Since the state sponsored doping from many nations around the world I have suspicion .
      I don’t feel anything ,I’ve grown skeptical of performances that aren’t followed by previous gradual development of speed. The country is known for doping it’s athletes. That’s all the proof is need. If it where an American Athlete I would have the same doubt.
      I trust no performances until it’s been proven it was done without performance enhancing drugs.
      It’s my opinion and don’t care wtf you think.

    • Leon Chien

      LMFAO….. So just because there were bad seeds from that country means all athletes should wear a bad hat? If that’s how your logic works, then you are pathetic. Swimmers chase time, not color of the skin, nationality, or whose peer have had been busted doping…. get real my friend.

      • avatar

        “That is the question”. The Russians had a State sponsored system of doping. everybody knows that now. Did the Chinese had one? We are not sure. My (fragile) opinion is that they had systems inside the country doping the athletes, and the Federation did not do anything to prevent them, was very tolerant!! You know, it is the same with FINA, they don’t want to spoil the image of the sport, and try to put the dust under the carpet

    • Pablo Valedon

      Hey moron! Who said anything about race?! I call out whomever breaks the rules and if your country happens to be one then so be it!
      Guess what I called out all the American doping athletes.
      What I don’t do is believe in performances posted until it’s been proven.
      So your complex on race is way off genius.
      So go get a good swim in or not.

    • Brett Davies

      Yes he did but now hd is modt likely using drugs to help him along .

  1. Dániel Sós

    Beni Kovács az olasz bajnoksag utan atugrottal a kinaira?

  2. Sean McNicholl

    Ahmed El GeneidyAly Maghraby hahahahaha

  3. João Santos

    Gonçalo Paquete Bernardo Graça Bruno Machado

  4. Liam Williams

    Brodie Williams Adam Chillingworth

Author: David Rieder

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David Rieder is a staff writer for Swimming World. He has contributed to the magazine and website since 2009, and he has covered the NCAA Championships, U.S. Nationals, Olympic Trials as well as the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio and the 2017 World Championships in Budapest. He is a native of Charleston, S.C., and a 2016 graduate of Duke University.

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