Swimming World Presents “Did You Know? – Tracy Caulkins”

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Did You Know? 

Fun Facts of Aquatics From ISHOF

Tracy Caulkins

 

Tracy Caulkins holds the record for most individual NCAA championship titles in a single year with five. She won the 100 and 200 yard fly plus the 100, 200 and 400 IM at the inaugural NCAA Division I Women’s Swimming and Diving Championships in 1982.

And her record will never be broken! That’s because of rule changes that were later made to the event lineup at NCAAs as well as the number of events in which a swimmer can now compete. Back then, swimmers could swim in as many as five individual events and two relays.

Known for her versatility—she set American records during her career in every stroke—Caulkins was always a factor in whatever race she chose to swim.

To learn more fun facts about Tracy Caulkins,
check out the full article in the March 2019 issue of Swimming World Magazine, available now!

Swimming World subscribers can download this issue in the Swimming World Vault!

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[PHOTO CREDIT: PETER H. BICK]

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FEATURES

016 BUCKLE UP!
by Dan D’Addona
It has been four in a row for the Longhorns, but last year was the closest yet—with no less than three teams having a mathematical shot to win the team title heading into the final relay! Expect more of the same at this year’s men’s NCAAs.

020 STILL STANFORD
by Dan D’Addona
Stanford dominated last year’s women’s Division I NCAAs, and even though the Cardinal are favored to win their third straight championship, this year’s meet should be different.

016 BUCKLE UP!
by Dan D’Addona
It has been four in a row for the Longhorns, but last year was the closest yet—with no less than three teams having a mathematical shot to win the team title heading into the final relay! Expect more of the same at this year’s men’s NCAAs.

020 STILL STANFORD
by Dan D’Addona
Stanford dominated last year’s women’s Division I NCAAs, and even though the Cardinal are favored to win their third straight championship, this year’s meet should be different.

023 ELITE TO REPEAT?
by Andy Ross and Cathleen Pruden
In NCAA Division II and III swimming and diving, the same elite teams seem to battle it out for the national championship each year. Both the Queens women’s and men’s squads have realistic shots at winning five titles in a row at D-IIs, while in D-III, Emory’s women will be looking for their 10th straight title, and Denison’s men are poised to win their third championship in four years.

026 BLUE-COLLAR SWIMMER
by David Rieder
Cal’s Andrew Seliskar has put in the hard work to enable him to swim at a higher level. He loves the sport, and he knows that if he wants to be successful at swimming, he has to be fully invested into it.

COACHING

010 LESSONS WITH THE LEGENDS: GUS STAGER
by Michael J. Stott

014 SPECIAL SETS: SEASON-LONG AND CHAMPIONSHIP PREP FOR 10-AND-UNDERS
by Michael J. Stott
When an elite swimmer shines, sunlight occasionally falls on the athlete’s coach. In the ensuing excitement, what is often overlooked is the contribution made years earlier by the 10-and-under coach who set the foundation for success and possible stardom by teaching proper mechanics, motivation and a love of the sport.

030 WHAT COACHES CAN LEARN FROM SWIMMERS (Part 1)
by Michael J. Stott
At first blush, education might appear to be a one-way street. Teachers teach, students learn. Same with sports—coaches give instruction, athletes absorb and, hopefully, execute. But time on the job often reveals a different dynamic. In the first of a two-part series, Swimming World shares epiphanies where swimmer interaction fundamentally altered coaching behavior.

040 Q&A WITH COACH JEAN-PAUL GOWDY
by Michael J. Stott

042 HOW THEY TRAIN: MADDIE KAUAHI
by Michael J. Stott

TRAINING

013 DRYSIDE TRAINING: EXERCISE EQUIPMENT SERIES—DUMBBELLS
by J.R. Rosania

JUNIOR SWIMMER

045 UP & COMERS: DANIEL BRANON
by Taylor Brien

COLUMNS & SPECIAL SECTIONS

008 A VOICE FOR THE SPORT
009 BEYOND THE YARDS
019 OFFICIAL WORD
025 DID YOU KNOW? TRACY CAULKINS
032 2019 SWIM CAMP DIRECTORY
044 HASTY HIGH POINTERS
046 GUTTER TALK
048 PARTING SHOT

20 comments

  1. Dawn Pachence

    Crystal Marie my swimming idol

  2. Bill Spahn

    I consider her the greatest female (maybe including male) swimmer ever

  3. Mark S Miller

    Bold statement coach—ran into one of your former FAST swimmers yesterday in Ft Collins she is a nurse at OCR; nice young lady.

    • Bill Spahn

      Mark S Miller do you remember her name? And why was that a bold statement?

    • Mark S Miller

      Not sure of her name, cute dark hair, nice gal spoke highly of you👍

      Tracy certainly escalated Womens Swimming to another level, she was a fierce competitor

    • Ken Hess

      I remember when Tracy came to Green River to help put on a camp when I was a kid!

  4. Debbie Sheehan

    I had the pleasure of meeting her last summer in Tokuo. She is a lovely woman.

  5. Jamie Forlini

    Dawn Pachence, mine too!

  6. Diane Pavelin

    Only swimmer to win National titles in all 4 strokes and IM. If not for the ’80 boycott and East German doping, she could’ve won 8 golds in Moscow.

  7. Stephanie Davis

    I remember seeing her when we swam at meets In Nashville.

  8. Rob Snowberger

    Best ever. Compare world and national records.

  9. Reena Kilgore Greer

    Remember seeing her at southeastern championships when I was young. She was amazing!

  10. Chantale Hansen

    One of my favorite swimmers! Met her at the 84 Olympics and it was like meeting royalty. Very nice person.

  11. Steve Cox

    Harpeth Hall High School in Nashville. TN Proud!

  12. Mike Burdick

    Bring the 100IM back to D1 swimming!