SEC Standouts From Women’s NCAAs

Photo Courtesy: Annie Grevers

by Peter Baugh, Swimming World College Intern 

There were 11 SEC teams who competed at women’s NCAA Swimming and Diving Championships. Here’s a look at each team’s most successful athletes:

Georgia (First overall) – Olivia Smoliga

Smoliga took first in the 50 and 100-yard freestyle at the meet, tallying 49 points for the first place Bulldogs. She set a NCAA record in the 50 free, posting a time of 21.21. The previous record was Arizona’s Lara Jackson’s 21.27 from 2009. Though she missed the championship final in the 100-yard backstroke, her time in consolations would have taken second overall. The junior was also on the Bulldogs 400-yard medley relay, 200-yard freestyle relay, 200-yard medley relay and 400-yard freestyle relay.     

Texas A&M (Fourth overall) – Lisa Bratton

2016.03.19 2016 Womens NCAA Swimming Championships_Texas A&M Lisa Bratton

Photo Courtesy: Reagan Lunn/Georgia Tech Athletics

Bratton scored 40.5 points for the Aggies. She placed fifth in the 200-yard individual medley and seventh of the 400-yard individual medley. Her highest finish was in the 200-yard backstroke, in which she placed fourth overall. Only a sophomore, Bratton will be a force in the next two years for the Aggies. She was also on Texas A&M’s 400-yard medley relay.  

Missouri (11th overall) – Katharine Ross

After taking first place in the 100-yard breaststroke at Southeastern Conference Championships, Ross continued to thrive at NCAAs. The junior took fourth in the 100-yard breaststroke to earn first team All-America honors. She was also ninth in the 200-yard breaststroke and 21st in the 200-yard individual medley.

Tennessee (13th overall) – Kira Toussaint

Toussaint picked up big individual points for the Volunteers, and was an integral part of the team’s relays. The junior took eighth in the 100-yard backstroke and 10th in the 100-yard freestyle. She also helped Tennessee to a second place finish in the 200-yard freestyle relay and an eighth place finish in the 400-yard freestyle relay.

Florida (19th overall) – Kahlia Warner

In her last NCAA Championships, Warner excelled in the diving well for the Gators. The senior took sixth place in the 1-meter competition and third in the 3-meter. She also competed in the platform diving event.

Kentucky (22nd overall) – Danielle Galyer

danielle-galyer-

Photo Courtesy: Peter H. Bick

Galyer became the Wildcats first ever national champion with a win in the 200-yard backstroke. The junior touched first with a time of 1:49.71. She also was 12th in the 100-yard backstroke and helped Kentucky to a 15th place finish in the 800-yard freestyle relay.

Louisiana State (27th overall) – Cassie Weil

Weil led the Tigers with a fifth place finish in the platform diving competition. The senior also competed in the the 3-meter event, placing 17th.

Alabama (28th overall) – Bridget Blood

Blood picked up seven points for the Crimson Tide, placing 10th in the 100-yard breaststroke. The junior also helped the team to a 13th place finish in the 400-yard medley relay.

South Carolina (29th overall) – Julia Vincent

2016.03.17 2016 Womens NCAA Swimming Championships_Julia Vincent South Carolina

Photo Courtesy: Reagan Lunn/Georgia Tech Athletics

Vincent excelled for the Gamecocks on the diving board. She took fourth overall in the 1-meter competition to score 15  of the team’s 18 points.

Auburn (33rd overall) – Annie Lazor

A breaststroke specialist, Lazor touched 13th in both the 100 and 200-yard breaststroke. The senior also competed on the Tigers’ 400-yard medley relay.

Arkansas (no team points) – Anna Mayfield

Mayfield, a senior, rounded out her career with a 21st place finish in the 200-yard backstroke. She also competed on two relays for the Razorbacks.

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Author: Peter Baugh

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Peter Baugh is a freshman at the University of Missouri and is the assistant sports editor for the Maneater, Mizzou's student run newspaper. He swam and played baseball in high school. He is a two time finalist in the National Scholastic Press Association Sports Story of the Year contest and was named the SSP Journalist of the Year for the St. Louis area. He served as co editor-in-chief for his high school newspaper, The Globe, and also worked for the St. Louis American newspaper.

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