Swimming World Presents “A New Hope: As Pools Reopen, Swimmers Reflect On Their Quarantine Routines”

Swimming World July 2020 - A New Hope - Photo By Vivi Guerrero

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A New Hope

by Dan D’Addona


The COVID-19 pandemic has swept across the globe and changed the lives of everyone in the world. Now, there is some light at the end of the tunnel as the world struggles to find normalcy again.

Swimming pools are beginning to open up—with new guidelines for safety—and hope continues to grow within the sport. After the initial shock, months of altered routine along with many levels of frustration and even despair, things are starting to get better.

“We are definitely seeing things happen. I am pretty optimistic,” says Canada’s Maggie MacNeil, a junior at the University of Michigan and gold medalist in the women’s 100 fly at last summer’s World Championships. “It definitely has been hard. It is definitely going to be interesting moving forward—something that we are going to be talking about for a very long time.”

Many swimmers took the time out of the water as a challenge to get stronger and do things they normally wouldn’t have done if in-water training had remained status quo.

The result could produce a group of stronger and faster swimmers as athletes now refocus for the 2021 Tokyo Olympic Games.

Social media has played an important role for the swimming world to remain close and stick together. They’ve also been able to see what teammates and opponents around the world were doing to stay in shape, and the results have been wide and varied:

• U.S. national champion Amy Bilquist, a 23-time All-American at the University of California, has been doing rapid pull-ups and finding unique outdoor places to exercise.

• Swimmers who have never really included running in their training regimen have been going on regular runs now to keep up their endurance.

• There’s been more focus on improving core strength.

Ky-lee Perry, a 10-time All-American at North Carolina State, says she has been working on her abs and has been running: “We do dryland basic ab workouts, Russian twists, burpees. I have been trying to still do sit-ups and push-ups. I am also trying to do some of my rehab stuff for my knee. The core is the main thing in swimming—it works everything. Once you lose that, you slow down. I have a strong core, but it could always be stronger. That is how I am going to get where I want to be,” says the senior sprinter.

To read more about how swimmers feel they benefited from having to totally change how they train,
Check out the full issue of Swimming World July 2020, available now!

SW July 2020 - Duncan Scott - Heart of Britain's Successful Surge - Cover[PHOTO CREDIT: IAN MACNICOL]

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Swimming World Magazine July 2020 Issue

FEATURES

017 A NEW HOPE
by Dan D’Addona
The COVID-19 pandemic has swept across the globe and changed the lives of everyone in the world. Now, there is some light at the end of the tunnel as the world struggles to find normalcy again.

020 ISHOF: “CALLING ALL TROUBLEMAKERS”
by Bruce Wigo
Sprinters are a different breed of swimmer. They’re not just free spirits, but they seem to be rule breakers and troublemakers who also are catalysts for positive change. In the first of a two-part feature, Swimming World takes a look at the stories of two of the most well-known female sprinters who fit this image: Dawn Fraser and Eleanor Holm.

023 GREAT SCOT(T)
by David Rieder
Scotland’s Duncan Scott should be an Olympic medal threat next year in the 100 and 200 free and maybe even the 200 IM, and he will be a key cog for British 800 free and 400 medley relays with gold medal aspirations.

026 TAKEOFF TO TOKYO: A STAR OF SWIMMING…AND HOLLYWOOD
by John Lohn
The latest installment of our Takeoff to Tokyo series looks at the career of the legendary Johnny Weissmuller, one of the first stars in the sport, and then a Hollywood hero.

COACHING

012 SWIMMING TECHNIQUE CONCEPTS: THE VALUE OF HAND FORCE ANALYSIS: PART IV—FREESTYLE
by Rod Havriluk
The first three articles in this series (Part I—Butterfly, Part II—Backstroke and Part III—Breaststroke) presented information about the value of using hand force analysis to reinforce positive technique elements and identify limitations. The current article includes more general information about force analysis with a freestyle example.

014 AEROBIC OVERLOAD: VOLUME REVISITED (Part 2)
by Michael J. Stott
Last month, Swimming World examined the role of volume in aquatic training. This month, some of America’s most successful swimmers share how volume shaped their development.

042 Q&A WITH COACH TOM JOHNSON
by Michael J. Stott

044 HOW THEY TRAIN EMILY OVERHOLT AND MARKUS THORMEYER
by Michael J. Stott

TRAINING

011 DRYSIDE TRAINING: THE NEED FOR STRENGTH
by J.R. Rosania

JUNIOR SWIMMER

046 UP & COMERS: ZACH TOWER
by Shoshanna Rutemiller

COLUMNS & SPECIAL SECTIONS

008 A VOICE FOR THE SPORT

010 THE OFFICIAL WORD

019 DID YOU KNOW? NO TO TOPLESS BATHING; HIGH DIVING; AND FIRST FULLY AUTOMATIC ELECTRONIC TIMING SYSTEM

029 2020 AQUATIC DIRECTORY

041 DADS ON DECK

047 GUTTERTALK

048 PARTING SHOT

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