Adam Peaty Launches ‘Project Immortal’ In Seach For Time That Can Never Be Touched

Jul 26, 2021; Tokyo, Japan; Adam Peaty (GBR) celebrates after winning the men's 100m breaststroke final during the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Summer Games at Tokyo Aquatics Centre. Mandatory Credit: Rob Schumacher-USA TODAY Sports

Adam Peaty Launches ‘Project Immortal’ In Seach For Time That Can Never Be Touched

The last time Adam Peaty designated a name for the work logged by the British star and coach Mel Marshall, the joint effort was dubbed “Project 56.” In that pursuit, Peaty sought to become the first man in history to crack the 57-second barrier in the 100-meter breaststroke. It was a lofty goal to set, particularly since no man other than Peaty – at the time – had even dipped under the 58-second threshold.

Peaty closed the book on “Project 56” at the 2019 World Championships in South Korea, where he delivered an almost unfathomable performance of 56.88 during the semifinal round. Pandemic be damned, Peaty endured a yearlong delay until the Olympic Games in Tokyo, where he defended his title in the 100 breaststroke.

Now, the 27-year-old is looking ahead and eager to chase additional greatness for what is already a Hall of Fame career. A fun-filled stint on “Strictly Come Dancing” complete, Peaty has announced the name for his newest plan, a blueprint that will take him to the 2024 Olympic Games in Paris. Through “Project Immortal,” Peaty is intent on leaving a mark in his event that cannot be touched.

“Doing a time that can never be beaten,” Peaty said was the defining characteristic of his latest endeavor. “The next three years is how we achieve Project Immortal. More than ever, we have to kind of attack. I know where I need to be to get to Project Immortal.”

Never is an almost impossible task when it comes to a stopwatch sport. At some point, all records are broken. For Peaty, though, the gap between him and the competition is a chasm, as only Arno Kamminga has been within a second of the Brit, the Dutchman owning a career-best mark of 57.80. So, if any current standout deserves the green light to discuss perpetuity, it is Peaty, who is also targeting the 2028 Olympics in Los Angeles.

“I’m not going to let someone say, just because I’ve reached a certain age, (that) I’m not a good swimmer anymore. That doesn’t make sense,” he said. “The reason I’m the fastest swimmer in the world is because I’ve thought differently. 2028 would take me to 14 years as a pro athlete – a 30-year career. I’m game for it, why not? Seven more years to set a time that no one will ever beat and achieve sporting immortality – the right way.”

The oldest current long-course standard in men’s competition is the 4:03.84 that Michael Phelps unleashed in the 400 individual medley to jumpstart the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.

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Steve Wall
4 months ago

Go for it Adam. You are the only man alive
that can do it. You have the will, and you have the determination. Good luck .

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Anonymous
4 months ago
Reply to  Steve Wall

agreed- Go Adam, were all behind you 🙂

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Anonymous 2.0
4 months ago

This dudes gonna go 53 and make it look easy.

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John
4 months ago

Oh, I’m sorry… I didn’t realise no-one else had ever set a WR by a margin, retained an Olympic final or had a son.
When Peaty has achieved a fraction of what Phelps, Dressel etc. have (all with humility) he will have more of a believable voice. The turning to 200m never happened, the WR in Tokyo never happened, fallibility in SCM and LCM 50 did happen… better to let your results do the talking!

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Eric Spencer
4 months ago

Best breastroker in the world. No doubt about it.

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Big Al
4 months ago

Why not now focus on the 200m breast, as a real (real) challenge?