2013juniorsCarsten Vissering places first in the prelims of the 100 breaststroke.
Courtesy of: Peter H. Bick


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WASHINGTON, D.C., June 25. CARSTEN Vissering, one of the top junior breaststrokers in the United States, made a verbal commitment to attend the University of Southern California in the fall of 2015.

Vissering is following the lead of fellow Nation's Capital Swim Club teammate Katie Ledecky, who made the verbal commitment to attend Stanford well before the start of the recruiting period.

The Washington Post first reported on Vissering's commitment, where the star breaststroker said ""USC was the right fit for me, starting with having the best breaststroke coach in the world. I just feel like Coach Salo is the best person to get me to the next level. He's had a lot of success with breaststrokers."


Vissering is correct in Salo's expertise in crafting breaststrokers, though his notable breaststroke alumni are female: Amanda Beard, Rebecca Soni, Jessica Hardy. Mike Alexandrov and Glenn Snyders continue to do well under Salo's instruction in his postgrad team, but on the college level, Salo will be hoping to fill a long-empty gap for points in the breaststroke. Salo brought in former national high school record holder Stephen Stumph to Los Angeles last season, but Stumph did not perform to expectations.

Vissering's best time in the 100-yard breaststroke is 52.83, done at the NCSA junior national last March to break the 17-18 national age group record. He posted a 53.49 at the DC Metros championship in February, which had been the national independent high school record until Jacob Molacek's 52.92 took it down a week later. He's also a strong 200 breaststroker, with a 1:55.44 lifetime best to his credit.

In long course, he boasts a 1:01.97 from last summer's junior nationals in the 100 breast and a 2:15.85 in the 200 breast from nationals.

Washington Post article